Mountain Heritage

Hubs on straight axle

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Just wondering what you guys do to stop your hubs from sliding?  The ones on my 3688 like to work their way outwards on me. Have to keep moving them back in to the correct spacing and tightening the bolt on it. Is my wedge worn out?  Can you put a spot of weld on the axle so it can't go past that point if it does move?  Heard a new set of wedges cost over $700.00!!?  Really wouldn't want to have to replace them at that price if I could help it!

suggestions?

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bitty    0

DO NOT WELD

Everything has to be extremely clean on the mating surfaces and the wedge bolt needs to be not rusted.

They are supposed to sit down a certain way on the "flat" spots on the axle. If things are worn out it needs machining done or to be replaced. 

Hopefully someone knowledgeable and who can describe better will be by here soon. It's something like 400 foot pounds of torque the wedges get tightened up to

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Was only thinking of putting a weld on the axle, not weld the hub to axle - just making a "stop" on the axle??

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Matt Kirsch    0

Your wheels are sliding out because you are using the brakes to turn a lot, I assume. If there is any way you can lessen or even completely avoid using the brakes to turn that will at least help with the immediate problem. Additional weight on the front, or just a change in the way you do things. We keep a full rack of weights on the 1066 because of this. That, and they're too heavy to throw on and off all the time, plus you're tripping over them laying in a pile by the door...

Are the wedges pulled way into the  hub when you have them tightened? That was the problem on the 1066, at least that's what Dad figures. It may not be kosher, but he added thin sheet metal shims between the wedges and the hub, which pushed the wedges out towards the edge of the hubs and allowed him to get them much tighter. This reduced the sliding on the axle by quite a bit. You'll have to experiment with the thickness, but it didn't take much.

 

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hanniedog    0

Take a wire wheel to the axle, wedges and hub real good. Then get the wheels set where you want them and start tighten the wedge. When you think it is pretty tight take a large hammer and strike down on the end of the axle. keep repeating this step until the wedge can't be tightened any more. 

 

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560Dennis    0

I would not recommend you weld the on axles . 

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George 2    0

Beside avoiding turning with the brakes, DO NOT USE SNAP ON DUALS under any circumstances. They tend to loosen the bolt if they have a huge overhang from the hub. One guy I knew long ago had this problem on a 1066 using snap ons. He switched to axle duals after tightening the crap out of the bolt and never had any more problems.

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bitty    0
4 hours ago, jass1660 said:

Do not weld on the axle!

X3

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So because I have snap on duals with spacers is that likely the big cause?  I have about 75-80% tread on duals.  I don't have weights on the front end either. Haven't found any yet at a reasonable price

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pete23    0

First off of course no welding of any kind on the axle. That is a recipe for breaking an axle.  What you need to determine is two things. Are the wedges being pulled together. .  Now check to see that the wheel is not touching the axle in any place except the driving flats. If the rounded center part of axle is touching wheel, it will never stay tight.  You can use same remedy for that problem as the problem of wedge coming all the way together. Put a shim of tough light steel (hack saw blade works) on the flat of axle.  A new wedge is correct remedy if it comes together  too far but shims will work.   No need to over torque, just tighten properly like book says (400 ft lbs  = a 100 pound man on the end of that four foot pipe supplied with tractor)  Rap on end of axle on  TOP of axle with like 3 pound hammer with wheel off the ground , tighten some more.  Machining the wheel for clearance is also proper remedy .. Have had dual hubs machined for clearance also.   Snap on duals are not good as all strain is on one single  hub.   Make sure your dual tire has considerably less air pressure than inside tire also unless the tire is already undersized. 

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CDN 400    0

You can buy brand new aftermarket wedges for $175 a side.

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You know off hand who is selling the after market ones? Fawcett's or Shoup or guys like that I am guessing?

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Matt Kirsch    0

Correction: The shims are under the flats of the axle like pete23 says. Not between the wedge and hub. That would be just about impossible to get right.

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CDN 400    0

Fawcetts has them part #hc1287801c91 or if you have a red or green dealer close they probably carry A&I and they have them as well.

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45 minutes ago, CDN 400 said:

Fawcetts has them part #hc1287801c91 or if you have a red or green dealer close they probably carry A&I and they have them as well.

Perfect...will check out A&I first.  Suggestion on best place to find axle hubs if I ever change the duals over to axle hubs instead of the snap on style?  What's the average pair of used hubs go for?  Anything particular to look for on the hubs (worn parts)?  Guessing if the center is worn oblong, or the area the wedge fits into...?

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CDN 400    0

I think I have a couple pairs of 3 1/4" hubs and rims.

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SMOKER 1    0

One thing no one mentioned.  After cleaning all surfaces of dirt and rust and paint, both the axle and hub, oil it good.  Do not use never seize.  Then tighten them really tight.  You might have trouble getting them loose in the future, but they will stay tight, even with snap on duals and hard braking.  Old IH dealer showed me this nearly 50 years ago and I have never had a wheel come loose.  Used to move the wheels a couple times a year to go from 30 inch rows to plowing in the furrow.  What a pain!

jerry

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superih    0

Rule of thumb is to run the inner tires 2 psi higher air than the duals to aid in turning.

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1480x3    0
2 hours ago, SMOKER 1 said:

One thing no one mentioned.  After cleaning all surfaces of dirt and rust and paint, both the axle and hub, oil it good.  Do not use never seize.  Then tighten them really tight.  You might have trouble getting them loose in the future, but they will stay tight, even with snap on duals and hard braking.  Old IH dealer showed me this nearly 50 years ago and I have never had a wheel come loose.  Used to move the wheels a couple times a year to go from 30 inch rows to plowing in the furrow.  What a pain!

jerry

x2  seen the oil trick work every time

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22 hours ago, CDN 400 said:

I think I have a couple pairs of 3 1/4" hubs and rims.

Sent you a message.  Re: hubs/rims

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