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jworley

Somebody save it

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I also posted this in the trucks section but I thought it may get more views here. I saw this over on AgTalk

 The guys friend wants him to haul it to the scrap yard to get it out of the way. He posted on AgTalk trying to find someone to take it.

That truck is too cool to get melted into Chinese junk. It's in Minnesota I think.

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WOW . Twin screw even

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You will have to go AgTalk to get contact info from the guy who has it. I don't know him or anything about it but, I hate to see it go for scrap when I know someone would want it

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Red Diamond 450-6, and a 5 speed with 3-speed axles plus a 2-speed Brownie. That's a Lot of gears for something that will only run about 55 mph.  Had to laugh at the guys thinking it was an Emeryville.  Not much in common between a CO-190 and an Emeryville.  I rode Shotgun in them both, frequently.  Dad even had me try to back a 40 ft livestock trailer into the loading chute in our corn crib driveway once with a CO-190.  After 2-3 attempts with no power steering I was done.  I was about six inches off to one side that I couldn't even see.  Not bad for 10 years old.

There was a guy posting on here 3 maybe 4 years ago looking for a CO-190.  Be nice if it ran.  Guys on ATHS would probably snap it up.  Be neat to pull into a Red Power RU with a couple M's and H's on it.

Couple of the ones I rode Shotgun in had the longer sleeper bunk,  longer by maybe 4 inches,  and they also had a couple of the bunk windows not punched out for privacy, which allowed flip out air vents to help cool off inside the cab in summer.  The plate the gearshift mounted to that also had the choke and hand throttle leaked enough hot air into the cab around the rubber seals after 10,000 miles to cause heat exhaustion.  But in winter it was all freezing cold air leaking in,  enough to cause frost bite.

The one comment on the other forum about the cab tilting while hooking to a trailer was alarming. The steering wheel did move or pivot some when the cab tilted, which would pin the driver in the seat.  You actually sat ahead of the front tires a bit, and no air ride suspension or air ride seats, ride was rough!  The cab was actually designed by Diamond T, and built by McLaughlin Body in Moline, I'll for many years according to what I read on another forum.  I think IH built more of them than Diamond T by far.

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Actually many of the Diamond Ts were built in Fort Wayne by IH.  In the mid-50s, IH & Diamond T had a deal where IH built the COs while Diamond T built heavy duty construction trucks like the RD-222-H, predecessor to the 210-230 series and the M-series, for IH.  I knew a guy who said his first job in Fort Wayne was to figure out whether a truck on the line got IH or Diamond T emblems.

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 Wish I had the time for a truck like that being RD parts are getting tougher to locate  I wonder how a DT360 or a DT-466 would fit in there.

Diamond T also offered that cab in Fiberglass I am thinking they also offered the RD450 engine. Doctor Evil you are correct in they road rough your bouncing around ahead of the front axle.

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I would think a DT-360 or DT-466 would fit under the doghouse.  Stacy David on Gearz put a different engine in a Cargo Star COE,  seems like it was a DuraMax, more compact V-8 than an in- line 6, but lots of room behind the cab!

I'm amazed how much more popular the RD-450 was than the RD-501.  The Big Block GMC V-6's were popular with livestock haulers too.  Lot of farmers wouldn't let diesel trucks haul their livestock. One livestock hauler in our area had a late '70's vintage Chevy C-70 or 80 single axle tractor and trailer he ran till about 2000 when he retired it, most of the small cattle feeders long gone by then.

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