FarmerFixEmUp

What's Your Heritage?

74 posts in this topic

12 hours ago, 696IH said:

English / Huegenot on dads side , english / Scottish on mums. Dads side was lucky enough to have a choice to come to Australia as settlers.....

Your dads side reminds me of my father's mothers side. Her family's business in London went broke in 1885 and there were 3 choices, debtors prison in England, a one way trip to Botany Bay courtesy of the British government, and out of town by sundown if you had squirreled away some money. They had squirreled away some money and one night boarded a ship under assumed names in the Thames estuary. Two weeks later they landed in Montreal and started a new life and a new business. Grandma was two years old when this happened.   

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Maltese, both sides of grandparents with my parents came to Australia after WW2. Like the German High command said nothing else to bomb in Malta.

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Geez George, that's fascinating, I read it all 8 times, that story never gets old;):lol::lol::lol:

 

 

seriously though, that's really fascinating to know that detail of how your family came to be where it is. I hope it gets documented for your future generations.  

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vtfireman85: Sorry about the mess up. Stuck key. I hope the moderator gets rid of the extra copies. Actually, my family is well documented on both sides. My mothers side family tree had been done about 40 years ago and we did my father's side about 15 years ago. We were very lucky as a copy of a journal detailing my father's family history from 1670 - 1900 was found using the internet in 2001. The source was a relative in Massachusetts who had gotten a photo copy from the Archives in Biggar, Scotland. When we advertised on ancestry.com we got a reply from one of her family that they had a copy of it. This was a long lost document that my father had last seen in 1926 and that copy got thrown out when my great grandfather died.     

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George, that's awesome that you have that, I hope you know I was joking about your multi posts.

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13 - 14th Generation from Dutch ancestors that located to 'The Cape' as it was then known from Holland sometime in 1689-1690.

I have a Dutch surname 'De Wet' (pronounced as 'de vet', meaning 'The Law') but with a lot of French Huguenot blood in me too. 

My Dad's maternal grandmother was a descendant from the French Huguenot with the surname of 'Le Roux'.  She married into another French Huguenot family 'Roux'.

My Mom was also a French Huguenot descendant with the surname of 'Delport' (or "De la Port"). Our ancestors got rid of all the fancy apostrophies and simplified the spelling...
Her paternal grandmother after whom she was named, was also a descendant of the 'Le Roux' family.
So that makes me a South African with a Dutch surname, with quite a bit more French blood in me... 

The French Huguenots were settled in 'The Cape' from 1688 onwards, and they had their own school and church located here in Paarl (Pearl), and Drakenstein (Dragon Mountain), and also an area that was referred to as Franschhoek (French Corner) Western Cape South Africa.  They brought with them their knowledge of viticulture, and in so doing established a thriving wine industry that still exists here in the Cape Winelands of the Western Capae province in South Africa.

The two 'de Wet' brothers that settled at 'The Cape' only came here in 1689-1690, and the one got 'connected' with the "unwed daughter of a certain widow Pretorius" (from the archives), and 95% of the de Wets in South Africa (me included) stem from that 'connection'.  The other brother was apparently more 'died in the wool!!!

It is interesting to note that by 1750 very little French was spoken at 'The Cape', and since 1770 NO French has been spoken here in South Africa.  So within the scope of 3 generations, the Huguenots with their French surnames became Dutch speakers.

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10 hours ago, Atilathehun99 said:

Zeeland, MI is right next to Holland which is one point on the SW Michigan Dutch Triangle.....Holland to Grand Rapids to Kalamazoo.  Lots of reminders of the Dutch influence in the names of the little villages (many now extinct).  Bentheim, Borculo, Graafschap, Noordeloos, Overisel, etc.

Funny thing is in North Dakota we have the German from Russia triangle. Covers the most of the middle of the state. Starts by the town of Zeeland or north of  Aberdeen South Dakota goes past  Bismarck  North Dakota and comes to the triangle point in our area. What used to be the little German town next to us was Balta ND and 30 miles away my dad was from Karlsruhe Nd these towns were all renamed from original English names railroad company gave them. If you went every 6 miles was a little town along the old rail roads. Mostly Every other one would be Norwegian with a Lutheran church and the German towns were Catholic Church. They didn't mix well either until the 50s when they started to  marry other faiths. Still some very German towns in the south and the great Lawrence Welk was from southern North Dakota. Our family name is Klein ,moms was Axtman. Those guys all had big families years ago 10 kids was common so lots of cousins.

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No one with Belgian heritage? A few years ago I went to a local exhibition about immigration from Belgium to the US between 1850 and 1950. Most of the Belgian people went to Illinois and Michigan.

For myself, I'm for the most part Belgian. On my mother side there is a small part Spanish (when the Spanish ruled our area) and on my fathers side a small part British.

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On my dad's side I'm a mutt, all of his ancestors have been here since the mid 1700's, English, Irish, Scottish, French, Indian...... My mom immigrated to the US from east Germany in the late 50's. They where from eastern part so they are also a mix of polish, Lithuanian, Russian and who knows what else. My wife's grandpa was Assyrian and her grandma's family started Seamart grocery stores in south east Alaska in the early 1900's so my son is quite the mix. 

Orin 

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I am Heinz 57 as well.  Mershon's came from the Normandy area of France back in the 1600s.  However I am so little French it is practically nothing!  I am mostly English and Irish with Cherokee (about 1/4) and some Dutch (grandma was Pennsylvania Dutch but grew up in IL).   I can document ancestors who fought in the revolutionary war and both sides of the Civil war.  All of my ancestors immigrated to the US before 1900 so I don't have any connection to Ellis Island.   Thx-Ace

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In no particular order,

Japanese

Irish (perhaps some Scottish in there as well... historians disagree)

English

German

Black

American Indian (Lumbee and Blackfoot)

Apart from the Indian ancestry, my earliest European ancestors to have come over seemed to have arrived in the 1600's from Ireland or Scotland. Three brothers who father was a ship captain. Some property records indicated he spoke only Gaelic and needed an interpreter in court filings of the day. The most recent was my grandmother from Japan (being a war bride) arriving back in the US with my paternal grandfather in 50 or 51.

Our family land today here in Indiana was bought by a father and brothers who came from North Carolina via Tennessee in 1837, The hand hewn log cabin they built in 1837 still stands (but now needs renovations). Interestingly (to me) was for many years that side of the family thought they may have originated in Belgium but now more records seem to indicate they may have been at least partly American Indian as they were known as redbones in Tennessee records.

American history is fascinating as many roots also reflect major world events at the time.

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My Dad was from England, his/my ancestors came from there in 1619 I did my heritage thing last year and my Moms people came from Ireland with some Cherokee and Italian but Im just plain ole Kentucky Hillbilly.......haha.  My family fought for both Yankee and Confederate during the Civil War as Yankee infantry and Confederate cavalry raiders and my GreatgreatUncle was a lifelong moonshiner in this south central part of Kentucky I still live in

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Mostly Irish with a little English thrown is along the way!

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1/2 Swede. 1/4 Irish. 1/4 German. Hard headed,stubborn with an ornery streak once in a while. Mostly dont care:D

According to Cliffy Clavens post i am probably Norwegian,Scottish and Polish...but i like Swedish meatballs, corned beef brisket with cabbage and drank enough beer in my early years to qualify as a straight up German....so i think he is wrong!!

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100% 5th generation Kiwi ( New Zealand)

Base make up Welsh/ English 50 %and Scottish 50%

With a name like Jones I can't avoid the Welsh/English connection but acknowledge the stubbornness of my Scottish heritage

Family Bible starts in 1798

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   Portuguese .

      My Dad came over from Azores Islands in 1920.

      Mother born in USA but her parents immigrated from Azores Islands also

      Tony 

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Hi Y'ALL!  My name is Mandi Trapka ☆   It is So great to reach out to everyone here, I feel like this is a kindred place for me.

 

Besides, most people in today's society look at me like I'm Looney when I portray enormous pride for my roots.

 
A little about me, raised in South Carolina, I'm a 34 year old painting contractor living on North Redington Beach, Fl.
That, btw, is west coast on the "thumb". I am 100% self made through hard work, all on my own.
 
My Great Great Great (3)Grandmother was Lucy Virginia McCormick,  the daughter of William Sanderson McCormick. The reaper was Originally invented in Virginia, by Robert McCormick Sr, and worked on for 20 years before being perfected by his son Cyrus Hall. Robert also invented a blacksmiths bellows, a hill side plow, and a hemp break among others. My grandfather William Sanderson was the brains behind the company and the mastermind of the industry setting written guarantee and credit.  I know a lot about the founding history of the reaper.  My grandfather kept an extensive diary and letters that are archived at The University of Wisconsin.   The best biograpy I have researched is a college thesis paper on the life of my Great Grandfather. 

 

The McCormick's are descendant from Thomas McCormick and Elizabeth Carruth.  The Carruths are first generation Americans.

In the past two months I have been delving deep into my genealogy.  The research led me to discover that if you have what are called "Gateway ancestors", meaning they settled America in the founding years, then it is easier to connect to Europe descent. 

With this, I have been able to trace my line back 1100 years and beyond.   It's an incredible feeling to say the least.

 
 
Lucy Virginia McCormick was the 5th daughter.  It was disheartening for many years, and because of the death of my grandfather (i think foul play) at a young age two decades after the reaper patent, he not only lived but died a poor man.  I felt a bit slighted but not much. The wealth of the company came less than 10 years after his passing.

 

Turns out, I was blessed after all.  Lucy married Samuel Rountree Jewett,  the son of a judge, and an otherwise unnotable man.  However,  I was likewise pleased to learn his ancestors were Maximilion and Edward Jewett, the first clothiers of the western world,  and settled and established 1800 acres of Rowley Massachusetts. 

A proverbial slam dunk, now,  that a month ago, on the free Genealogists website Wikitree, I entered my name and fathers and so forth,  and connected to Samuel and Lucy.  They were already established in the database, and all ancestors figured out in the click of an instant, thanks to cyber algorithms. 

 
The actual short list:  
 
Cousin to 41 former U.S. Presidents 

ALL Magna Carta Barons (1,2,3 cousin's 4 great grandfather's)

 

GREAT GRANDFATHERS include:  (all are g.g.)

Sir Henry Hastings, Knight

Sir Walter Burgh, Knight

Sir Hugh Talbot, Knight

Sir John FitzGeoffrey, Knight

Sir Thomas de Grey, Knight

Gilbert de Lacy,  Knight Templar

William Hale Esq. (I'm 10th cousin to the current Queen of England)

Gerald (Windsor) Fitzwalker

Robert Stewart II, King of Scotland 

Robert the Bruce,  King of Scotland 

William the Conqueror Normandy 

Yaroslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Kiev
 
Hakon Mikli the Mighty Sigurdse, King of Norway
 
Olaf I Sitricsson, King of Dublin
 
Llywelyn ap Lorwerth The Great, King of Wales
 
High King of Ireland,  Brian Boru
 
_______________________________________________
 
Ergo, my corner is weak at the moment, the timbers splintered.
 
 
 
  Nonetheless  My life, My dreams, my hope, my ambition, my drive, my purpose and destiny seem to make a more  profound sense, as all the above have come full circle.    
 
 
Thanks for reading, it's so great to meet yall!! I hope you have a great day and I look forward to hearing from y all, so please, don't hesitate to reach out and say hi.
 
As always, Best regards 
I bid adieu ~*~
]|\/|[ANDi
 

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My dad's side is from England and Germany and my mother's side is pretty much all Finnish like many that moved into our area for mining.

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Mums side were English convicts on the First Fleet to Australia in 1788. Dads side left England just before WW1. 

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Dad's side is all Finn, not surprising for MN, I have dozens of cousins who still are 100% Finn.

Mom's side is more interesting mixture: English, Irish, Scottish, Dutch

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Are any of us REAL sure?????

Sorry----couldn't resist.  :lol:

Mike

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quote:  "are any of us real sure"

That's a good one Mikem!!!!:blink:

******

Reminded me of an ongoing "family conflict" on a land transaction I was working on a number of years ago.  All parties were real close friends of mine.  A nephew was sorta trying to nudge the adopted son out of the farm picture.

Nephew made the statement to me that the adopted son was not really a member of the X family.  I immediately replied that the adopted son was probably the only one with certified and recorded papers at the courthouse stating that he was a member of the X family---------and that it may be that all others would need to take a DNA test to prove their bloodlines!!!  (Hmmmm-----sorta brought that conversation to a close)

*******

So--------I will say that "reportedly", I am from English descent on both sides of my family tree.

Father's side settled in New England in early 1600's----------mother's side into Georgia or southeastern coastal area at an unknown date (maybe exiled from England??)------they were in south Mississippi by 1801.

Reckon-----I must still be sorta of a half-breed; with folks fighting on both sides of the Civil War.

Proud to be a Mississipian------with some scrap iron and Delta Dirt running in my blood.  I am just me------no control over my ancestors; and for damm sure no control over children, grandchildren, etc.!!!:o:)

DD

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Pretty much a mutt,   French Canadian, Scottish and German on Dad's side. (Gonya/Gagne ancestors were just about the first white folks in Canada.)   German,Scottish,English,Welsh & Belgian on Mom's side. Interestingly all my ancestors were really good at getting tossed out of whatever country they came from, so everyone was here or in Canada by 1815.  

Being mostly a mix of German, Scottish and French, I'm usually at odds with myself.   

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Emigrated from holland with my parents and nine syblings in 1952 at age 7. my wife family came in 1956 at age 7.

Her families tree was traced back to 1370 and bublisheb a book for family members.  Takes roots back from 2016

1370.Very interesting.

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