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Missouri Mule

skidsteer grading attachment

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SO I have a driveway that is roughly 1/2 mile +/- . I normally take care of it with any number of things including a box blade, regular blade, and sometimes I use my bobcat. Normally I just get about 1/2 a bucket full of rock and just drive and grade it. It works pretty well but always leaves a small trail of rock on the edges. I kinda like using my bobcat just because its fast and easy. My only problem is that I try to keep a crown on my road to shed water, so sometimes I have to use the tractor to get the angle right. I am thinking of making an attachment to grade my driveway with the bobcat. I have seen a lot of guys are building a setup that has 2 sets of grader blades into a sort of contraption that looks like it would do light grading well. Does anyone have or use anything of the sort? Im not building a blade with dolly wheels because ill just use the tractror. I have even thought about finding a junk box blade and welding a plate on the back and using it from behind on the bobcat?

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Ihfan4life    0

Bobcat makes graders for skidsteers, they work great! Idk if you could fabricate something that will work as well? Perhaps a 3 point blade with a quick attach plate and some dolly wheel for depth control? 

Sid

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Since you already own a box blade, why not make a plate, mount it to your skidsteer, and see how it works?

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MTO    0

A piece of belting dragging behind the SS would knock the windrows off the bucket leaves. Or a narrow piece dragging behind bucket in front of tires a foot wider than bucket would allow backing up. Just thinking out loud. 

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mader656    0

I drag a cattle guard around works great pills hard however...

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Willie B    0

While you want a crown, you also want it longitudinally flat. The local crushed rock facility uses a group of I beams welded together as a drag. Their yard is smooth as a baby's but. I've thought about it, A drag half the width of the road would provide a road with two facets, and a narrow "peak" in the middle. Two heavy I beams would lay parallel to the road spaced half the road apart. Use as long as you can afford, at least 10' long. These will run like sled runners flat side down. Cross members would be I beam laid like an H.

I have some grouser stock I would weld to the leading edge of the crossmembers. I suggest a stiff A frame tongue that hinges at the leading edge of the drag.

Make it as heavy as your tractor easily tows.

Put the crown in your road with a scraper back blade. Finish it with the drag.

Nothing flattens road with stones in it. I feel good road gravel is crushed to 1-3/4" and smaller. You want a ratio with mostly coarse (1-3/4") with just enough fines to fill the gaps between.

John D Rockefeller had his crews build many miles of beautiful roads for horse and wagon traffic. His specifications included very good drainage. Once all drainage was in place, they placed 6" rock to a depth I think was around a foot deep, well crowned. A thin layer of 2" went on to fill the voids between the 6" rock. A 6" deep layer of what began as very stony gravel but was crushed to 3/4" and less. This affords good surface to grade.

A hundred years, these roads are in great condition.

Another famous gravel road is Mount Washington. It was similarly built. Maintenance crews drag a drag made up of dozens of stiff push broom heads. No washboards, or potholes have ever been present.

 

Willie

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Willie B    0

My father was obsessed with erosion, and road maintenance in a time it was less publicized. We border Green Mountain National Forest. In my youth we had the run of 50,000 acres of forest land covered with log roads. On thirty year intervals, loggers would use these roads, the rest of the time, it was a few locals. Dad was of the opinion that you had to get the water off the road. A properly shaped road will remain that way only briefly if everybody drives in the same pair of wheel tracks. I was taught to drive with one wheel in the center, the other on the edge of the roadbed. This practice eliminates the low wheel track that allows rainwater to run down the road. A road used this way must be about 15' wide or less for travel, then slope down to a ditch. Try it. You won't get the potholes, or ruts that form when you straddle the center.

 

Willie

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I built a skid steer land plane and it works great for driveway maintenance, it's two 8" H beams 12" apart and an old bucket cutting edge at the front, 48" from front to back.

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I understand the speed of a skid steer, but from my experience a tractor's three-point hitch is best-suited for grading.  Willy B's thoughts sound great to me.

This is the best basic grader for gravel that I have encountered for a skid steer.  http://www.roadrunnerblade.com/Products/Skid-Steer-Models/  The wheels tend to be necessary to minimize the inherent bouncing of a skid steer and the tendency for the front of the attachment to dig too much into the grade.  The side plates on this one will act a bit like skis to keep it relatively level.

Another alternative is to rent a Harley rake for a skid steer and set it up to angle and crown towards the center.  Playing around with those settings to get the grade right will probably take four times as long as actually doing the job once the machine is set right.

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AKwelder    0

We have a 3 point landscape rake that has an angle setting and gauge wheels, it really impresses me with its job.   We have used a box blade to break the hard pack then rake it to the center while lowering the wheels until there is no ridge

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Willie B    0
On ‎7‎/‎17‎/‎2017 at 9:42 AM, EquipmentJunkie said:

I understand the speed of a skid steer, but from my experience a tractor's three-point hitch is best-suited for grading.  Willy B's thoughts sound great to me.

This is the best basic grader for gravel that I have encountered for a skid steer.  http://www.roadrunnerblade.com/Products/Skid-Steer-Models/  The wheels tend to be necessary to minimize the inherent bouncing of a skid steer and the tendency for the front of the attachment to dig too much into the grade.  The side plates on this one will act a bit like skis to keep it relatively level.

Another alternative is to rent a Harley rake for a skid steer and set it up to angle and crown towards the center.  Playing around with those settings to get the grade right will probably take four times as long as actually doing the job once the machine is set right.

I agree a Harley rake should be your second investment. To make use of the Harley rake, you need material. If your road surface is of what we in the Northeast call bank run, you'll need a different machine. Bank run gravel, in my youth was what a bank provided. Glacial till in VT is where the glaciers went to die. We have hills here and there. One might be pure sand, (I own about a million Cubic yards of sand), the next might be boulders. In VT 231 towns try to give their taxpayers value. If they have a pit (or two) nearby where material is cheap, and trucking is also cheap, they might try to use "bank run". As the vocal voters become better informed, they will demand "crushed gravel". Now we move to better, but exponentially more expensive secondary roads.

If the material the town grader encounters is entirely processed, crushed, it is much easier to maintain a good road.

A perfect road will contain very little air, and an absolute minimum of water. The best road is one of layers. Below is drainage. Water has no place to hide. Any drop of water big enough to be affected by gravity needs a void to flow through to leave the scene.

You have to separate drainage from surface. There are numerous ways to do this, usually layers of small, then smaller stone are used. There are membranes available, usually sealed bid decision making rules out revolutionary solutions.

The top layer must be of particles of varying size ranging from 1-3/4' through dust. The best, most durable surfaces are a conglomerate of stone sizes.

Add to these 1-3/4" stones some component of 3/4" stone. Many of the spaces get filled. This mix is much more stable under foot, or tire.

 

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Willie B    0

Now add 1/4" stone. More voids get filled, it becomes less water receptive. finally add sand. Now very little water sinks in. Shallow grading won't turn up big rocks.

Willie

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Kevingweq    0
9 minutes ago, Willie B said:

(I own about a million Cubic yards of sand

Just curious what the sieve tests are on your sand ?  Is it good for septic ?  Mason ?

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bitty    0
29 minutes ago, Willie B said:

Now add 1/4" stone. More voids get filled, it becomes less water receptive. finally add sand. Now very little water sinks in. Shallow grading won't turn up big rocks.

Willie

Would you be interested in beating some sense into the morons running our township and Local Pendot crew? Please 

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Willie B    0
2 hours ago, Kevingweq said:

Just curious what the sieve tests are on your sand ?  Is it good for septic ?  Mason ?

Never been tested. It is very fine. It has been used for mason sand with good results. I don't expect it'd be coarse enough for good septic.

 

Willie

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redturbo    0

Got 900 ft of gravel driveway to grade once & awhile,  then county road in front of the yard that local graderman sucks at.  I looked into box blades,  didn't like the looks of them to do grading.  They seem like there meant to move material with the back closed in.  I started searching the internet,  found land planes.  I brought this one from local jd dealer(8ft wide),  says Frontier on it.  Which they sublet out & painted it off green.  It works awesome for grading!,  just what I wanted. I have found couple different brands out there that make for 3pt hitches & skid steers.  I used to use the 8ft blade that's parked in front,  but the gravel just rolls out the ends.   

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