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MTO

I thought EVERYONE knew

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MTO    0

Was reading Red Power this morning, an older copy from this spring with the yellow I600 on the cover.

An article about a younger couple from WI that bought and restored an old Scout.

Two pictures in the article made me cringe.

One was showing them removing differentials from a donor Scout  with the donor suspended with a chain from a loader bucket. Now the caption DID say to use jackstands which I saw none being used.

Second picture that made me say this topic`s heading was the Scout body sitting up on cement/cinder blocks which is bad enough but the blocks weren`t even sitting with the open cavities vertical! Duh! 

I thought EVERYONE knew!

Obviously not...and to those who don`t, this is how you place a cement block to support weight.

null 8 in. x 8 in. x 16 in. Concrete Block

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660 driver    0

Aparently not everyone does mark....which doesn't surprise me.

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TomH    0

I watched a guy jack up his F250 and proceed to place 2 eight inch concrete blocks under the axle with the webbing vertical as Mark shows and a length of 2 X 6 on top.  He lowered the truck and the blocks crushed immediately. That was a lot of weight I realize but the moral of the story is; concrete blocks are not jack stands.

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MAGNUM    0

i thought everyone knew that a 2x4 was not an actual 2x4, people sueing menards and home depot, because they boards don't measure correctly, false advertisment.  we are doomed.

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oleman    0

Picture hanging of the wall of our high school shop in 1961 were of the legs of two teenagers extended from under a car who were crushed when the cement blocks they were using as jack stands under their 58 Chevy Impala when they attempted to change out the clutch.

I prefer cut southern yellow pine 2 X10 sections over red Chinese jack stands for my staging. 

Goes back the the time I was under a 2,800T USN ship supported by clear fir shoring timbers in a drydock in Seattle.

 

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mader656    0

I knew there was a reason to keep all those ruff cut 6x6. And 8x8 blocks, full size too....

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DOCTOR EVIL    0

I don't even trust my jack stands!  I use 2-3  at a time plus a jack which is a No-No, but I trust it more than the jack stands.

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1466fan    0

I keep a stash of 6 x 6's to block up with. Got some jack stands buy I don't trust them with much more than a car. 

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660 driver    0

Have multiple rough sawn blocks we use. Weigh a crapload but could support a battleship!

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red211    0

Using blocks used to thin the weaker ones out, natural selection you know.  Now most are so protected they never do anything that requires the least bit of common sence to avoid injury so the natural selection chain has been interrupted.........as Magnum said..."We are doomed", to have to coexcist with morons and idiots that would have been thinned a generation or two before.    Sarcassm......kind of.  :ph34r:

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bitty    0

I need a few to change the tires on the camper. Lol

:)

 

It was along the road by where we were chopping today. The left rear tire is flat also........ what is it that meatloaf said, three out of four isn't bad

IMG_20170624_130141877.jpg

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Baradium    0
On ‎6‎/‎24‎/‎2017 at 11:28 AM, DOCTOR EVIL said:

I don't even trust my jack stands!  I use 2-3  at a time plus a jack which is a No-No, but I trust it more than the jack stands.

 

I've never seen a jack stand fail, but I've seen more than one jack fail.      I definitely do not trust a jack more than stands.   The only time the jack is the sole support for something I'm under is as I'm putting the stands in or taking them out. Now what I will do is put the jack back up to where it just has a slight amount of pressure against the vehicle.   You do NOT want a lot of weight on the jack because that could compromise the stability of the stands.    But doing it that way, if a stand were to fail the jack is already snug to take over.  

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rcb    0

Ahahaha, I learned the cement block lesson first hand. Pulling the trans out of a car with the front end three blocks high. I heard an odd grating sound and looked over to see a crack shooting up though the blocks. I bolted up and out of the way as it came crashing down. I was very thankful. I think I was 17 or 18 at the time. After that I didn't use blocks any more, save for a rest for a brake caliper or the like.

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DOCTOR EVIL    0
2 hours ago, Baradium said:

 

I've never seen a jack stand fail, but I've seen more than one jack fail.      I definitely do not trust a jack more than stands.   The only time the jack is the sole support for something I'm under is as I'm putting the stands in or taking them out. Now what I will do is put the jack back up to where it just has a slight amount of pressure against the vehicle.   You do NOT want a lot of weight on the jack because that could compromise the stability of the stands.    But doing it that way, if a stand were to fail the jack is already snug to take over.  

Stands are made in China by somebody who learned to weld that morning, then they're painted over the Slag that wasn't even chipped off the welds.  The jack is Much better made than the stands.  Like I said, 2-3 stands, think the little ones are rated 3000# each, big ones are 8000# each,  have 4 of each size,  have 8000# bottle jack and 3000# floor jack.  And I raise the jack just enough to share a bit of the load on the stands.  Been doing it that way for 20 years.

Son had a friend from college killed a couple years ago when the newer Mustang he was putting a clutch in rolled off some jack stands.

I'm getting to the point where any worked needed on my cars/trucks that requires wheel/tire removal and then getting under the vehicle while it's on jack stands I hire somebody with a lift to do.  Stuff like replacing the rear axle oil seals on my tractors I'd still do.

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bitty    0

If I'm going to work under a vehicle and the tires are going to stay on it I'll Jack it up and I'll put a rim underneath the tire can't roll out of it I think it's much more stable I have a couple of 14L16.1 rims actually 11 inch wide rims when they're sitting on the ground they are really stable

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MTO    0
15 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Stands are made in China by somebody who learned to weld that morning, then they're painted over the Slag that wasn't even chipped off the welds.  The jack is Much better made than the stands.  Like I said, 2-3 stands, think the little ones are rated 3000# each, big ones are 8000# each,  have 4 of each size,  have 8000# bottle jack and 3000# floor jack.  And I raise the jack just enough to share a bit of the load on the stands.  Been doing it that way for 20 years.

Son had a friend from college killed a couple years ago when the newer Mustang he was putting a clutch in rolled off some jack stands.

I'm getting to the point where any worked needed on my cars/trucks that requires wheel/tire removal and then getting under the vehicle while it's on jack stands I hire somebody with a lift to do.  Stuff like replacing the rear axle oil seals on my tractors I'd still do.

And that safety is questionable

 

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MTO    0

 

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Baradium    0

According to a bit of research, it appears the standard for lifts is a uniformly distributed load.  While a non evenly distributed load may be practical, that video is more about selling lifts than an actual certification test.  

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MTO    0
16 minutes ago, Baradium said:

According to a bit of research, it appears the standard for lifts is a uniformly distributed load.  While a non evenly distributed load may be practical, that video is more about selling lifts than an actual certification test.  

This may be.

My biggest problem with my/any lift is accomplishing an evenly distributed load. I agree that is the goal but not easy to do. 

In a perfect world, cars/trucks would carry equal weight on 4 corners. Not the case.

Second issue is finding stable lift points on many vehicles. Again, not easy to do. 

Third is finding both of the above. Nearly impossible. 

And fourth, I have lifted SO many with this lift, I`ve become apathetic about it. 

Local tranny shop had a 1 ton pickup on their 2 week old US popular brand lift.

Came back from lunch and truck was sitting halfway through their closed garage door. 

US popular brand name company had a new lift installed in 2 days and paid damages to door/truck Hmmm...

Nothing is absolutely safe to get under nor is travelling in a car/plane/cycle/tractor.

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TroyDairy    0

FWIW.....  when I worked at the Chev dealer for a bit after high school i liked the drive on "alignment" style ones.  Then the extra jack that slid between the axles to lift the car enough to remove tires etc.  I always felt better with the 2 post fore and aft one also.  I did have one truck fall on a frt control arm placing.  At least it was not high and did not go off off.  The flat one that sat on the floor pan of a car was quick but not sure safest thing.

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MTO    0
10 minutes ago, TroyDairy said:

FWIW.....  when I worked at the Chev dealer for a bit after high school i liked the drive on "alignment" style ones.  Then the extra jack that slid between the axles to lift the car enough to remove tires etc.  I always felt better with the 2 post fore and aft one also.  I did have one truck fall on a frt control arm placing.  At least it was not high and did not go off off.  The flat one that sat on the floor pan of a car was quick but not sure safest thing.

Oh yeah, the drive-on ones are the safest/most expensive but the 2 posts are the most versatile/affordable. 

And there`s only one profession cheaper than a shop owner... tell them New Guy.

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wtom24    0

I had a similar accident when I was a teenager. My dad always said to put the spare tire under the frame in case the car fell. Replacing brakes with the car on cinder blocks-had been that way for hours. Suddenly the blocks shattered and the 53 dodge fell on my legs; saved by the spare tire.

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jeeper61    0

Even the solid blocks will crack you are much better off with wood blocks.

I use stands and put wood blocks under tires and keep the jack just touching the lift point before I get under a car

At one time a lot of shops used wheel stands for safety when working under cars on a lift I wonder why they don't any more?

I figured insurance companies would require it. 

 

Atlas® Vehicle Wheel Stands 6,000 Lbs. Capacity

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IHRunner    0

Always assumed a cinder block was a device for storing snakes, mice, and black widows in the wild.

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