Brews4me

Old Intl Crawler TD???

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I have an opportunity to buy an old TDsomething

In my families barn covered and hopefully not too beat up, been sitting for 40 years.

Will get exact details when I get down to look in person at the thing and will get serial and such info

Hopefully you folks can point me in the right direction for advice??? Have time and space to work it over this summer before I even decide to buy it.  

 

Questions:

What's the steps to try to start up this old gal???

New Bat

New motor oil

New coolant

 

I've always been into tractors and vehicles but a crawler is new to me!

 

Thanks so much 

 

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my relative got some number off the thing that said 8625D??

does that sound like any good info???

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8625D is the part number for a brake pedal on a T9 or TD9. The serial number we need will be on a plate riveted to the dash, lower left. When sitting in the seat it should be down by your left foot. Tell us where you are, there may be someone on here that is close that can go and give you hands on help to get it going.

 

George

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Thanks much!

This thing is on the border of NM an CO.

 

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That's a bit of a drive for me. If photos are available, that would help determine the model. Best thing to do if it has sat for that long is to make sure engine is loose and lube up all moving parts prior to attempting a start up. will minimize the chance of breaking something else in the process. Jim.

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picts are in the near future. need to get down to the property since it was closed all winter. it's in a shed so no telling how much light there is to see or space to work.

will be my adventure for a while i think.

only accessible in summer so I better get my behind moving.

I know I need a battery and some oil, what type of oil should I use???

what is the start up process for something that has sat for 40 years???

 

Thanks, Jim

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I'm just starting down this road so thanks folks and bare with my minimal knowledge of this subject!

 

 

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First thing, lets back up and tell us your name so I dont have to call you "Brews"

If it is a TD something, you will need Gas, Diesel (10 gal. min.) Engine oil (diesel type) grease and a grease gun, 90-140 wt. trans oil. (for transmission, rear end, rollers and final drives. Oh, and a couple of cans of penetrating oil (PB Blaster smells nice) Water for radiator.

Wrenches and sockets, all sizes. Pliers screwdrivers, Small hammer for now, bigger one will come later.

Battery with jumper cables when it goes dead. extra rolls of electric wire and connectors, electric tape. emory cloth for cleaning connections.

Lots of shop towels and hand cleaner. and a box of bandaids (you will thank me later)

Leave the beer at home. You will have plenty on your mind without the extra distortion. 

Don't replace the filters until we know what model you have. It they are wierd ones, you may need the old filter to get a number to get a new one. Go slow and take lots of pictures before you start tearing it apart.

Welcome to your new hobby, I hope your wallet shares your enthusiasm. Jim.

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Did have it above, my name is Jim also.

 

i'm thinking big box of bandaids!

This is a great list of starter items. I usually take half the garage when i go down to the ranch, live in town and do this on the weekend.

Been goofing with the old Allis and Deere stuff that's been there since I was a kid. Never fails that I need a tool that's at home.

 

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More info on me

 

Been lurking on site for several years. Just now getting serious about Internationals.

Have a Deere 310 SG, Deere 350 Dozer, Allis WD14 and lots of other small toys.

IT administrator in oil and gas by trade and rancher/construction wanna be by night and weekend.

 

Name is Jim and like this site much! 

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Sounds like an interesting project ! There is a lot of advice and help available on this forum from others who have been down this same road.. 

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Been down this road too many times. First the itch then some green changes hands and here we go again and some more green changes hands then eventually ya get to ride it around its a sickness really girlfriend calls it therapy but i wonder about my sanity at times great sounding progect though good luck russ

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7 hours ago, russ said:

Been down this road too many times. First the itch then some green changes hands and here we go again and some more green changes hands then eventually ya get to ride it around its a sickness really girlfriend calls it therapy but i wonder about my sanity at times great sounding progect though good luck russ

Yup, got 10 motorcycles that all started with an itch.

I have a sickness for bikes and tractors, at least it's an illness that provides tons of fun and fixing up old stuff is so very gratifying!  My wife just shakes her head!

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Xwife used to through a fit every time but she's now an X current girl friend say's she understands maybe she actually dose we'll see I guess russ

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Should i lubricate the cylinders before cranking???

someplace i heard to put down the cylinders auto trans fluid to break free or lub  old cylinders.

 

 

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I like Sea Foam Deep Creep for my old tractors, it gets in most anywhere.

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50/50 acetone/atf works well.  First work on getting the gas side to work.  Depending on the model and age it may have a magneto or a distributor and coil.  There is a small grounding switch built into the front end of the manifold that cuts out the ignition when you switch over to diesel.  Open it up and clean the contacts with fine sandpaper.  Also there is a device to lock the carb float in the up position to avoid gas siphoning into the head when switched to diesel.  It is controlled by the linkage that travels through the middle of the block from the injection pump linkage.  Sometime that linkage and/or the float gets stuck and won't let gas into the carb.  If it uses a magneto and you need plug wires, get the copper cored ones only.  Avoid new Champion spark plugs.   As said, take your electrical kit with you, as you will have to replace wiring as either mice or a prior owner are bound to have chopped it up!  12 volt batteries work fine on them converted to negative ground in my experience, even if it was a 6 volt system.  The gauges and lights are the only thing that wont work on 12.  The starter handles it fine.

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Thanks all, I'm making my initial list of tools and oils to take to soak up this baby, then will go back in a week or so to get serious.

It's in a barn 200 miles from my house so not overly convenient to tinker with.

 

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TD- something, gas start diesel= 12 volt electrics.

T- something, gas only = 6 volt electrics.

unless someone converted it

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And when you put the battery in, it is positive ground, not negative.

George

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21 hours ago, Rawleigh99 said:

50/50 acetone/atf works well.  First work on getting the gas side to work.  Depending on the model and age it may have a magneto or a distributor and coil.  There is a small grounding switch built into the front end of the manifold that cuts out the ignition when you switch over to diesel.  Open it up and clean the contacts with fine sandpaper.  Also there is a device to lock the carb float in the up position to avoid gas siphoning into the head when switched to diesel.  It is controlled by the linkage that travels through the middle of the block from the injection pump linkage.  Sometime that linkage and/or the float gets stuck and won't let gas into the carb.  If it uses a magneto and you need plug wires, get the copper cored ones only.  Avoid new Champion spark plugs.   As said, take your electrical kit with you, as you will have to replace wiring as either mice or a prior owner are bound to have chopped it up!  12 volt batteries work fine on them converted to negative ground in my experience, even if it was a 6 volt system.  The gauges and lights are the only thing that wont work on 12.  The starter handles it fine.

What's the reason behind acetone and ATF???

Acetone thins out the ATF and then evaporates??

Just trying to understand???

Before starting is it necessary to drop the pan and clean out any crap, surely after years the oil or liquid that is there would be gnarly and may not drain well??

 

Thanks, Jim

 

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Jim, At 200 miles away, you should plan for all contingencies. Probably a good idea to take the whole shop with you.

After looking the machine over, first thing I would do is see if engine is loose.  See if you can roll over engine by pulling on fan. A little pressure on the belt will help. If engine is loose, you are miles ahead of the game. 

SInce the machine has been in a shed, probably no water in the oil pan. I would crack the drain plug slightly to see if any water seeps out. Then pull the spark plugs, set the decompression lever on gas cycle and squirt some oil in the cylinders. Good idea to pull the valve cover off, oil up the valve stems and rocker arms and make sure the valves are loose in the guides. Prevents bending push rods or breaking rockers

Clean and change the oil in the air filter canister. Probably need to drain and change the diesel. New fuel filters. Flush and fresh gas in starter tank. Oil up the throttle and decompression linkage on side of engine.

Now you can crack a cold one. Jim.

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1 hour ago, crawlernut said:

Jim, At 200 miles away, you should plan for all contingencies. Probably a good idea to take the whole shop with you.

After looking the machine over, first thing I would do is see if engine is loose.  See if you can roll over engine by pulling on fan. A little pressure on the belt will help. If engine is loose, you are miles ahead of the game. 

SInce the machine has been in a shed, probably no water in the oil pan. I would crack the drain plug slightly to see if any water seeps out. Then pull the spark plugs, set the decompression lever on gas cycle and squirt some oil in the cylinders. Good idea to pull the valve cover off, oil up the valve stems and rocker arms and make sure the valves are loose in the guides. Prevents bending push rods or breaking rockers

Clean and change the oil in the air filter canister. Probably need to drain and change the diesel. New fuel filters. Flush and fresh gas in starter tank. Oil up the throttle and decompression linkage on side of engine.

Now you can crack a cold one. Jim.

yup, 200 miles keeps it interesting, even for food!

even though it's not positive it's a TD9, i went ahead and ordered a shop manual. gotta be close. Great advice all folks, thx!

 

 

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Does anyone know the basic thread size/count on plugs for the TD's????

Got a compression gauge and want to make sure it will work or I will buy some adapter before i go to the stix!

 

 

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