U-C

Making Loose Hay

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Big Bud guy    0

Anybody use these or seen them in your area?  My cousins had one of these too.  Didn't use it all that long. 

IMG_0827.JPG

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U-C    0
18 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

Anybody use these or seen them in your area?  My cousins had one of these too.  Didn't use it all that long. 

IMG_0827.JPG

Some years ago I have seen one for sale online, I think it was on www.farmersbuysell.com

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U-C    0

An Austrian Farmer is using a buckrake to haul his hay because it is to steep for a Loader wagon. He mowed the grass with a Motor mower and tedded the hay by hand. The tractor is a Steyr (this brand is part of the Case New Holland group).

-Urs

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db1486    0
7 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

Anybody use these or seen them in your area?  My cousins had one of these too.  Didn't use it all that long. 

IMG_0827.JPG

I never got to run one but a good friend that dad used to work had 2 of them I think. One got turned into a stack mover and the other one was used up till he retired about 5 years ago. Dad ran that haybuster when he worked for him and we always talk about how we should buy one for doing hay close to home. You could put he hay up a bit tougher than round baling too.

I don't think they were that slow for putting up hay, but again I've only seen it work and never run it myself. The one problem with them is if you sell hay it's no good.

I wish I would've taken pictures of it in action but never did. He used to pull it with a 1486 years ago and then a 7120 for as long as I remember. Seemed good on the big side hills too.

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dale560    0
8 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

Anybody use these or seen them in your area?  My cousins had one of these too.  Didn't use it all that long. 

IMG_0827.JPG

They made those in Jamestown ND and used to be a lot around here.a neighbor used one until a couple years ago to stack sweet clover. All the old ones around people would buy for scrap and remove the stacker part and use the movers.

 

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hagan    0
1 hour ago, dale560 said:

They made those in Jamestown ND and used to be a lot around here.a neighbor used one until a couple years ago to stack sweet clover. All the old ones around people would buy for scrap and remove the stacker part and use the movers.

 

neighbor had one and had some really good hay and he had the smaller one and tied to a farmall 400 it would not go slow enough and stacking a 80 of really good hay he would have to dump every time thru the field. He put my Hydro 70 on it so it would not plug up. Stakhand would make 2 rounds per stack but that thing was always full. He didn't use it much longer and got a stakhand 

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dale560    0

One of the big complaints everybody said is they didn't pack the center of the stack or the way it laid the hayin you had a soft spot. Leading to spoiled hay in the middle. I guess they were faster than a fork for putting up hay. Our next door neighbor had a Hesston stack hand . He pulled it with a 1456 and usually hauled every stack home as he made it . His hay land was 4 miles away but it kept him busy.

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U-C    0

Haying with a AEBI transporter TP 48 with AEBI hayloader:

Pictures are courtesy of the AEBI & Co. AG Burgdorf

Aebi_LD32_LW_7_[3059].jpg

Aebi_LD32_LW_8_[3058].jpg

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U-C, You had a picture early in the thread of the "bob sled" or whatever they would be called there in Switzerland. My dad's first cousin Adelrich Regli is on the back of this one, obviously posed for the camera.

590c9231df781_AdyRegliJr.inrearofbobsledteamatAndermatt.thumb.jpg.d251538d4df15f9b823171305ce4a6c2.jpg

They had a ski train at Andermatt, but this one was marked Oberalp, so I don't know if this is it, or whether this was the railroad line? It shows Andermatt below.

590c929a914f2_OberalpZug(Train)aboveAndermatt.thumb.jpg.1e2d0b7acb2d81aa6f55f64651fc3d1c.jpg

And this is another old photo of Andermatt, taken sometime after Grandma left there. That was Grandma's family's church on the hill. 

590c91e95b6a6_AndermattasitlookedwhenRosalieleftitred.thumb.jpg.64a759aedf0aed1f0a325003311449fc.jpg

I was visualizing haying on those mountainsides in your photos. There had to be some bad accidents occasionally? Gary;)

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IKS    0

Modern hay stacking

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U-C    0
6 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

U-C, You had a picture early in the thread of the "bob sled" or whatever they would be called there in Switzerland. My dad's first cousin Adelrich Regli is on the back of this one, obviously posed for the camera.

590c9231df781_AdyRegliJr.inrearofbobsledteamatAndermatt.thumb.jpg.d251538d4df15f9b823171305ce4a6c2.jpg

They had a ski train at Andermatt, but this one was marked Oberalp, so I don't know if this is it, or whether this was the railroad line? It shows Andermatt below.

590c929a914f2_OberalpZug(Train)aboveAndermatt.thumb.jpg.1e2d0b7acb2d81aa6f55f64651fc3d1c.jpg

And this is another old photo of Andermatt, taken sometime after Grandma left there. That was Grandma's family's church on the hill. 

590c91e95b6a6_AndermattasitlookedwhenRosalieleftitred.thumb.jpg.64a759aedf0aed1f0a325003311449fc.jpg

I was visualizing haying on those mountainsides in your photos. There had to be some bad accidents occasionally? Gary;)

Hi Gary

I made a little mistake on the location of Andermatt, the town is located in Canton Uri (which is one of the founding states of the Swiss Confederation in 1291). I have an Ancestor that came from Altdorf which is the capital of Uri. How knows maybe we're related! That type of bob sled in the picture is called a Bob in german the sled's you have seen in the video that I have posted are called "schlitten."

Haying on does slopes are dangerous some have lost their lives when the vehicle tipped over. Or they slipped when mowing wild hay with a scythe!

You should look up Andermatt on google maps it looks a little different now then back when your grandma lived their. Did your grandma tell you about the legend of the Devils bridge (teufelsbruecke) north of Andermatt?

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U-C    0
26 minutes ago, IKS said:

Modern hay stacking

That is a cool video

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U-C    0

Here is a video of old AEBI one axle tractor with drive trailer and AEBI hayloader:

 

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SDman    0
On ‎5‎/‎3‎/‎2017 at 11:02 PM, Big Bud guy said:

Anybody use these or seen them in your area?  My cousins had one of these too.  Didn't use it all that long. 

IMG_0827.JPG

Used to be several of those in our area-some were still in use until 5-10 years ago. One guy used to put up a lot of hay with one of those and a 5488 IH tractor for many years. We were a Haybuster dealer all those years so you can imagine why there were several here.

As far as loose hay is concerned, that was pretty much the "law of the land" for putting up hay around here until the late 1970s-early 1980s when the round baler came on strong. Farmhands mounted on tractors the way dale560 describes were very common around here as well. IH tractors from Hs/Ms all the way to 544/656/666s had Farmhand F10s/F25s mounted on them like the one Zach Grant has pictured; John Deeres from 2 lungers all the way up to 3010/3020s had them as well. One thing that set this area apart was a local blacksmith made quite a living for many years installing front axles from trucks under all those Farmhand tractors. Those axles were much heavier built and better suited for Farmhand tractors-especially once everybody started using Farmhands for big round bales.

As far as putting up loose hay, they would leave the mowed grass sit for a couple days and then use a Farmhand with a haybasket attachment like dale 560 described to push the hay into small piles referred to as "bucker piles" around here. They would let the hay sit for 2-3 weeks until it was fully dried, and then make it into giant stacks like you folks describe. One thing about it that ranchers loved about that loose hay-it would last for several years in the haystack. You could feed 5 year old hay from a haystack and the quality of the feed would be just as good as the day it was put up.

Sadly, most of the "ol boys" that put up hay that way have pretty much passed on.

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dale560    0
8 minutes ago, SDman said:

Used to be several of those in our area-some were still in use until 5-10 years ago. One guy used to put up a lot of hay with one of those and a 5488 IH tractor for many years. We were a Haybuster dealer all those years so you can imagine why there were several here.

As far as loose hay is concerned, that was pretty much the "law of the land" for putting up hay around here until the late 1970s-early 1980s when the round baler came on strong. Farmhands mounted on tractors the way dale560 describes were very common around here as well. IH tractors from Hs/Ms all the way to 544/656/666s had Farmhand F10s/F25s mounted on them like the one Zach Grant has pictured; John Deeres from 2 lungers all the way up to 3010/3020s had them as well. One thing that set this area apart was a local blacksmith made quite a living for many years installing front axles from trucks under all those Farmhand tractors. Those axles were much heavier built and better suited for Farmhand tractors-especially once everybody started using Farmhands for big round bales.

As far as putting up loose hay, they would leave the mowed grass sit for a couple days and then use a Farmhand with a haybasket attachment like dale 560 described to push the hay into small piles referred to as "bucker piles" around here. They would let the hay sit for 2-3 weeks until it was fully dried, and then make it into giant stacks like you folks describe. One thing about it that ranchers loved about that loose hay-it would last for several years in the haystack. You could feed 5 year old hay from a haystack and the quality of the feed would be just as good as the day it was put up.

Sadly, most of the "ol boys" that put up hay that way have pretty much passed on.

A lot of local guys would weld up adapter plates and mount w9 front ends on Ms . Dad bought a super M once with Minneapolis front end mounted.  I have seen a truck front mounted a couple times if you were lucky and found a power steering sector you could add power steering easily. One truck front I had seen mounted used just the front frame cutoff and mounted axle and sector with springs attached under  original tractor frames. 

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SDman    0
2 hours ago, dale560 said:

A lot of local guys would weld up adapter plates and mount w9 front ends on Ms . Dad bought a super M once with Minneapolis front end mounted.  I have seen a truck front mounted a couple times if you were lucky and found a power steering sector you could add power steering easily. One truck front I had seen mounted used just the front frame cutoff and mounted axle and sector with springs attached under  original tractor frames. 

Same here. Some did have power steering and some truck frames used had the leaf springs still attached. I guess you could say they were ahead of there time because they had "front axle suspension" like many of today's fancy MFD loader tractors. Didn't need a computer to run the axle suspension, either-lol!!

I hated working on those tractors with the truck front ends. No two tractors/truck front ends were the same. They used whatever truck frame was available and mounted it to a particular tractor the best way possible for strength. When you had to split the tractor to install clutch, you always had to deal with the truck axle. Some of them could be unbolted from the rear tractor frame without a lot of difficulty, and some of them you had to cut the truck frame to split the tractor. One long-time mechanic at our dealership owned a gas-powered chop saw just for cutting through those truck frames to split them. When you put the tractor back together then you had to weld the truck frame back into one piece as well. We always warned our customers that there was no flat-rate times for working on those tractors with truck front ends. They got billed for every minute we spent having to deal with the truck frame. I don't miss those days one bit.

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7' New Idea semi mount mower then a 9' IH 1100 trailer mower pulled by an H and later, a Super H.

IH dump rake and New Holland pto side delivery rake.

F10 Farmhand on a 460 diesel with the hay basket and no hydraulic push off and no stack frame.

No cabs, radios or air conditioning. Many a high 90's to 100 degree days.

Memories? Green alfalfa does not make a good substitute for toilet paper.

 

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U-C    0

It has been a while since I posted something on this thread. Here is a video of a BB Umwelttechnik's Double knife Sickelbar mower with three blades (the cutting system is from Busatis). The combined length is 8 meters (26.2467 feet)

A swiss company has a 10 meter version or 32.8 feet in imperial which is a new model

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U-C    0

Huerlimann Tractor with a newer 3 point mounted sickle mower mowing hay in Oetwil am See in Canton of Zuerich Switzerland. Huerlimann tractors were manufactured in Wil Switzerland from 1929 to 1983 and since then they are Manufactured by the SAME Deutz Fahr Group (back then known as Same Lamborghini Huerlimann Group) Same bought Huerlimann in 1977. 

 

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U-C    0

I haven't posted anything on this thread for a while now and thought to post this film from 1947:

 

 

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Baradium    0

There's one of those Hesston haystackers that has been up for sale in the Matsu valley (Anchorage area) on craigslist periodically.   So there at least was someone doing loose hay down that way.

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Jaa600    0
On 4/30/2017 at 9:13 PM, updraft said:

Pretty modern, U-C.  I will try to give you some loose hay memories. 

Dad was a part time farmer so we only did about six or seven acres of hay.  Had two milk cows to feed.  Brownie was a Guernsey and Nellie was a Holstein. Dad bought the farm only about 5 years earlier and didn't have much for equipment.  WW 11 was going on so new things made from steel weren't available even if someone had the money to buy.  All available steel was going to the war effort.  What we did have was a good old Farmall Regular for the tractor.  The mower was an Oliver (red with yellow wheels), converted from horse drawn with a five foot sickle bar.  Don't laugh guys.  It worked good but took a lot of rounds to get the job done.  Someone had to ride the seat on the mower to push down the lever and raise the sickle on turns or when crossing hay already cut so it would not clog up.  The rake was an old converted horse drawn , high wheel dump rake.  the trick with that was to dump each time in line with the dump from the last round  to somewhat form a wind row as progress was made across the field. I liked riding the rake when I got lld enough.  Step on one pedal to raise the rack, and the other one to push it back down. The wagon was decent.   It had an over the wheels flat deck  that Dad had built..  The running gear was the undercarriage from a 1932 ford coupe.  Hay racks front and rear.  Other equipment was two pitch forks and four human bodies.  

 

After the cut hay dried in the sun for a couple of days, it was raked into windrows.  After more drying the windrows were forked into shocks all over the field.  Then the tractor and wagon.  IIRC, the procedure was that my older brother drove the Farmall and Dad loaded the shocks onto the wagon by pitch fork.  Mom and I were packers.  I had to stay with Mom because I was too young to run loose.  We had to walk front to back and back to front on the wagon to keep drawing the load in.  Not  bad at first but as the hay got deeper the walking got harder.  Much like walking in deep snow w/o snow shoes.    By the time the load was four feet deep, I can remember being  darn glad to lay down in the load and ride to the barn.  Once there Dad pitched the hay through a large window type opening with a swinging door, into the loft of the barn.  That was not rest time as we had to move hay to the back and walk on it there to pack it.

All in all we were a little ahead of Cyrus Mc Cormick, but not a lot.

 

Charlie

 

Wow... I know you probably look back on that with fond memories but no wonder kids migrated to the city. I have pitched untold thousands of square bales and ate  enough hay dust to winter a small horse but I don't think I have it in me to pitch hay like that. I would sell the cows first. But then, I do have a lazy streak...

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Willie B    0

My father (born 1922) was a farm kid. I was destined to be a farm kid, but the Japanese changed history for lots of us. By the time I was a teenager maybe 1968, or 1969 we lived on 1/2 acre backed up to Green Mountain National forest. There was plenty of unused hay land. My older sister had to have a horse. We put up loose hay using the equipment from the farm. It was mowed with a scythe, bundled, loaded, and stacked with a hay fork. The shape of the stack simulated a thatched roof.

My father's skill with a hay fork leaves me astounded to this day. He would heap hay until he was able to stab the center of a pile and lift maybe 50 lbs on a fork. We had no hay wagon, only a small trailer. Four of these forkfuls of hay were arranged on the corners of the trailer deck, a fifth was placed in center to bind.

Next layer was six, then two in center. Ultimately, a Farmall Cub, or a Jeep hauled a seven foot wide trailer loaded with 12 feet in width, 7 feet in height.

It was unloaded in reverse order forming a stack of ten forkfuls in a circle. Layer upon layer built it to 15 feet in height. A big tarp covered the top. For one horse, grain supplemented a hay diet.

Willie

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dale560    0

All the older people around here talk that field balers never came out until late 1940s. Before that hay was stacked by hand in field in 6 to 8 ton stacks. 12 x 20x 15 ft tall. They then hauled hay with a wagon or a sled all winter for the cattle and to refill barn. They said when hay was scarce in other areas an old stationary square baler would go around and people would pitch stack onto baler then load bales on truck to reload into box cars on the railroad to ship out.

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U-C    0

Haying in the Canton of Bern Switzerland

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