td9inidaho

Dayton rims, legal or not?

Recommended Posts

Looking into getting a dump truck, most of which we are looking at are int 2554's or L8000's.  1994 to 97's, but most have Dayton rims all around, am hearing rumors that dot  has them as illegal, is there any truth to this?  Done some online searches and can't find anything more than "3 piece" rims as illegal. Thanks for any info you all might have.

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dayton style rims are legal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, td9inidaho said:

Looking into getting a dump truck, most of which we are looking at are int 2554's or L8000's.  1994 to 97's, but most have Dayton rims all around, am hearing rumors that dot  has them as illegal, is there any truth to this?  Done some online searches and can't find anything more than "3 piece" rims as illegal. Thanks for any info you all might have.

Mark

They are legal we run them on our trucks. Usually heavier duty trucks ran Dayton wheels. We have them on all our grain trucks other than our newer semi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do DOT inspections you are all good, Canada, US and Mexico. Just don't over tighten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Find some 22.5 one piece rims and tires, solves all the problems. They fit your Dayton  hubs, and are drop center type wheels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for the reassuring information, trying to help my son get into some side work for extra money and would hate to get a truck that wasn't going to pass inspections right off the get go. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The issue in my area with Dayton rims is finding a tire shop that will work on them. Most, if not all in this area, will not put tires on or work on 3 piece Dayton rims.

I have changed some myself, and have done some flat repairs, but they are a lot of work and a couple specialty tools really help ...

You defintely need to know what you are doing when you are airing them up, especially if the tire has been off the rim, or a new tire going on.

There have been many serious injures and deaths from Dayton rims blowing apart while being aired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of your split rims have been scrapped...If you are lucky enough to get one of the beauts any time you are messing with it put it in a cage or chain it.  As far as daytons ran quite a few. Just make sure you put them on straight, use a 5 gallon bucket. Don't over thighten and don't remove the lugs all the way when taking the tire off.  Check and make sure the inner dual is not against the stops. Otherwise it'll crack the spoke.  I was a mechanic for a trucking company where we ran 70 Mack trucks all daytons. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, tpr4274 said:

Don't over thighten and don't remove the lugs all the way when taking the tire off.

Curious why you shouldn't remove  the lugs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loosen up the lugs , leaving the nuts at least half way threaded on the studs. Then take a small hammer and tap the wedges to pop them loose. The nut being still on the stud keeps the wedge from flying into your kahoonies (or worse)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh ya.  Now I feel stupid. I thought he meant leave them part way on the whole time not just while taking tentiion off. Thanks for straitening me out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do the Dayton rims look like ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Dia480 said:

What do the Dayton rims look like ? 

I can't post pics or links to posts with my tablet.  Do a search on "Dayton truck rims" and you'll get several thousand pictures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope this doesn't hijack the thread. I worked for Dayton Steel Foundry which later was changed to Dayton Walther Corp from '72 to '76. Best job I ever had driving interplant. had the foundry, two machine shops and a warehouse all in the Dayton Ohio area. Had probably 6 or 7 acres of rough castings ready to go to the machine shops at any one time depending on customer usage. Supplied almost every truck manufacturer except out west where Budd wheels were really popular. Don't remember exactly but I would guess we had at least a dozen or more trailers leaving every day by carriers, that's a lot of wheels.  Between EPA and convienance of one piece rims they closed the foundry around '84 or '85. I got laid off in '76 and didn't go back when they called me back.

Dennis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I worked for Sivyer Steel Foundry in Bettendorf, Iowa from 1985 to 1989.  Think it was around 1987-'88 they got a pattern in and ran samples of Dayton wheels, 5-spoke if I remember correctly.  May have been a small production run. Not sure if they were for Dayton or somebody else.  There was only the one small batch.  I was purchasing agent for their Riverside Products Division,  I was chasing my own hot parts out of the place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/8/2017 at 4:54 PM, tpr4274 said:

. . .  Just make sure you put them on straight, use a 5 gallon bucket. Don't over thighten and don't remove the lugs all the way when taking the tire off.  Check and make sure the inner dual is not against the stops. Otherwise it'll crack the spoke.  I was a mechanic for a trucking company where we ran 70 Mack trucks all daytons. 

Recently purchased my first truck with Dayton rims.  I don't know what you mean by "use a 5 gallon bucket"  and don't understand  "the inner dual is not against the stops".  What inner stops?  Can you or someone please post a pic or link so I know what you mean.  I bought an older Loadstar 1700 but want to make sure I do things right and not "crack a spoke".  I'm sure the spoke hubs are very expensive, if available at all.

I apologize if I hijacked the thread ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not sure what he means by the stops. The inner dual has to fit snugly against the raised part of the wheel casting. You then put the ring on and then the outer rim. I think the 5 gallon bucket is to "square" up the wheels so they don't wobble. We used a large deep well socket instead of the bucket and set it against the tire at the bottom. You then spin the tire as you tighten the lugs  so it doesn't wobble. You might have to tighten one or two lugs more than the others to get it to run true. When the socket doesn't move you have it right. Don't worry about torqueing the nuts, just make sure the nuts are tight and there is no wobble. Been doing it this way for 40 years and have never had a problem.

I hope tpr2474 gets back in here, I have never heard or seen of a spoke cracking.

Dennis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, jingles1928 said:

I am not sure what he means by the stops. The inner dual has to fit snugly against the raised part of the wheel casting. You then put the ring on and then the outer rim. I think the 5 gallon bucket is to "square" up the wheels so they don't wobble. We used a large deep well socket instead of the bucket and set it against the tire at the bottom. You then spin the tire as you tighten the lugs  so it doesn't wobble. You might have to tighten one or two lugs more than the others to get it to run true. When the socket doesn't move you have it right. Don't worry about torqueing the nuts, just make sure the nuts are tight and there is no wobble. Been doing it this way for 40 years and have never had a problem.

I hope tpr2474 gets back in here, I have never heard or seen of a spoke cracking.

Dennis

I'm sure he's referring to the stops welded to the flange of the rim, that prevent the rim from slipping on the hub should the assembly become loose for any reason. If the rim turns far enough on the hub, one or both valve stems will be ripped out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea, after reading it again it makes sense.

Dennis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Dayton was purchased by Meritor which quickly killed the brand. Dayton was the name most people used for Cast  Spoke wheels. I needed a new 22" cast spoke hub for a 95 Ford LTL 9000 a few years ago and most dealers just said "no longer available", they weren't interested in crossing over to any thing else. I found a dealer in Wisconsin (V&H Trucks) that found me a new Gunite hub and they still make them. 20" hub for 22.5 wheels and 22" hub for 24.5 wheels.

DWF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now