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FarmallTom

The New Job

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So I recently parted ways with my previous employer after a long year of company turmoil. I was pretty bummed for a week or so there because after three years of Rep work, my territory was just starting to actually yield some decent regular and repeat business. <_<

I guess there was a plan behind all of it though...

I called a good friend of mine (whom I worked for back in my Electrician days) to ask if he'd mind being a reference for me as I started the job search once again and it turned out that he had just been considering hiring someone to do Ad/Marketing/Field Rep work for his dozing and drainage business.

Anyway, I spent a couple days this week riding with him as I begin to further familiarize myself with the company and the industry, in general.

Thought I'd share some pics of his tile plow. Hope you enjoy...

 

IMG_5378_zpsr2t3xegn.jpg

IMG_5380_zpsa2dlo4f7.jpg

 

...and a short vid:

 

 

FT

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Here's another from day 2.

Here we are plowing in an 8" main:

 

 

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I bet you can feel that through the ground a ways away!!  We don't have those around here...too many rocks the size of that cat.

 

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Awesome plow, Tom! Good luck with the new job. 

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Good for you finding something like that. Sometimes it's nice to turn a new leaf in the work world. Best of luck at great success!

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Good luck with the new job Tom!  

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  That looks like some rich mellow dirt.

        Out here that ground would probably yield four bale cotton with plenty of Sun & timed irrigation.

     I guarantee you that track layer and shank would not be that steady in my reclaimed alkali  . The hard pan would stop it in its tracks.

     Looks impressive,  they run leach lines out West of me to drain brackish ,salty water.

      Good luck in your new job. Looks like a great adventure,

      Tony

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That's a job?:) Looks like a cool operation. Good luck, hope everything works out!

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Thanks for all the well wishes. I appreciate that.

I think it's going to work out really well. The work that it will involve is fairly diverse and, like I said, I've known the owner for many years.

In case anyone is interested, that Bron plow is powered by a 650 hp Cummins and I know it can plow in at least 12" pipe when needed.

Sometimes putting that power to the ground can be a bit of a problem though... :unsure:

 

IMG_5385_zpsgddbgur3.jpg

 

FT

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Good Luck......So Tom, what's the Tow out machine, a Tank Retriever?

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3 hours ago, Rainman said:

Good Luck......So Tom, what's the Tow out machine, a Tank Retriever?

In this case, they tried to use the track hoe to help pull through the tough spot but it was just too much.

So, instead, he cut the tile, lifted the plow and walked it out. Then they dug that first 10' or so with the hoe.

I would guess if it was really buried, it would require the dozer. (at least?)

 

FT

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I've heard many people talking about tile but I've never quite understood why it's needed on such a large scale. It's all small fields and red clay out here.

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14 hours ago, yellowrosefarm said:

I've heard many people talking about tile but I've never quite understood why it's needed on such a large scale. It's all small fields and red clay out here.

In the "old days", you just put tile in spots that were regularly wet, to try to get them dried out.

Today we know that proper drainage is about much more than that.

It isn't just about draining the low-lying, wet areas. Instead, we have to take into account how long it takes ALL of the ground in a field to "perk" a given amount of rainfall. If it takes a few days for your field to fully perk down a couple of inches of rain, you can essentially assume that as lost growing days for your corn, etc. The issue is that the water has replaced the oxygen in the soil, which inhibits plant growth.  The faster you get that excess water away, the more growing days you have.

Also - timely water removal allows the ground to absorb or "process" more rainfall, which means less erosion. We have customers that have completely eliminated some of their waterways because it doesn't wash there anymore.

 

FT

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That faster "perk" time can gain you valuable planting days, especially during a wet spring.  It seems that around here you can get onto tiled ground 2-3 days earlier than ground with no tile. People used to just run low spots and good flat ground but a lot of guys are finding that the tighter clay soils more common on the hills can really be helped also in this area. 

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All the best with your new job tom!

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Tom,good luck with the new career, and wow, that's some machine, looks faster than the clay tile trenching machines I remember.  BK

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my question is we have about 7 t0 8 inches of black soil then we hit clay a lot of tile is starting to go in around us, kind of all new around here the thought years ago was why spend that money when around here you could just buy more land a t a reasonable price, not so anymore, was wondering with that clay how the tile would work, wouldn't it just pack tight around the clay and quit working?

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