560Dennis

Maple Syrup Season

101 posts in this topic

Another 10 tonight 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We made another 30 gallons last night😀 Has been an early season to say the least. Our total is 130 so far. Over the last 15 years we have been anywhere from 130-253 gallons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, 1066lover said:

We made another 30 gallons last night😀 Has been an early season to say the least. Our total is 130 so far. Over the last 15 years we have been anywhere from 130-253 gallons.

Are you packaging kegs or the plastic containers 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do 5 gal plastic and all retail sizes, my mother sells at farmers market so all year long we are breaking down and repackaging for that. When we are boiling it is just so much easier to fill the 5's to keep things rolling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it true what I've been hearing about the syrup being bitter this year?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Atilathehun99 said:

Is it true what I've been hearing about the syrup being bitter this year?

news to me, sounds like some derivative misinterpretation of the sap having low sugar content. just means it takes more sap per gallon of syrup. i dont know how syrup would be bitter because it all has the exact same sugar content....thats what makes it syrup. 66 degrees brix at 219 degrees farenheight (66 percent sugar minimum)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I have ever tasted bitter syrup, a neighbor that boiled after a big run had some sap that say too long before boiling and the syrup had a bit of an after taste but still not bitter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Myself and the neighbor made about 6 or 7 bottles worth. Low sugar content for sure. I made some after the trees budded and it turned out well too. Made some caramels with some and they were epic! I know some say the sap is lower quality after the trees have budded but I really have had no issues that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, 660 driver said:

Myself and the neighbor made about 6 or 7 bottles worth. Low sugar content for sure. I made some after the trees budded and it turned out well too. Made some caramels with some and they were epic! I know some say the sap is lower quality after the trees have budded but I really have had no issues that way.

Ick! Buddy syrup is revolting, the smell makes me gag, once sap starts getting yellow it's time to quit 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Um syrup revolting??? U got to be joking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 660 driver said:

Um syrup revolting??? U got to be joking!

Buddy syrup is revolting. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is our monster, a king 5x14 wood fired evaporator, 3.2 million btu/hr. Sometimes it seems we spent at least 3.2 million hours splitting firewood to feed it

IMG_3298.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having a rough night tonight, we got into the wet wood and tings have slowed down significantly. Ugh!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMG_3303.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice rig vtfireman, looks identical to ours. We are close to 200 gal of syrup after last nights boil. Hope we get a couple more decent runs before we bud here in the valley. My bil's uncle has a pellet burner with the steam away hoods in his garage that is a sweet rig, get it going and can be drawing syrup in about 15 minutes. Very efficient but I love the old school wood fired myself. Syrup just tastes sweeter after all the hard work splitting, stacking and feeding the wood to the beast!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1066lover and VTfireman, we must have similar number of taps.   I run about 1000 taps, all 5/16" health spouts.  All on gravity lines.

 I have a 4'x14' lightning evaporator, oil fired.     I burn 14 gallons of heating oil per hour, but make about 5 to 5.5 gallons of syrup per hour.  As well, I am in the range of 150 to 250 gallons per year.

 

 For others, the name "Sugar Maple" is a misnomer. The tree that people often call sugar maples are actually "Rock Maple."      There are 4 species of trees that are members of the sugar maple family: Rock, Red, Black, and Silver.   Here in the Northeast we don't have many, if any Black Maple. But we sure have a lot of Rocks and Reds.  Of my 1000 taps, I may only tap a dozen red maples, and no silvers.   I only tap the red maples if my lines happen to travel right by them. Otherwise, their lesser sugar content and their earlier finish to the season (tree budding out earlier)  having bad sap can spoil a whole tank worth of good Rock Maple sap.

 Rock Maples By far have the highest sugar content.   If you collect sap that is 2.0% sugar, then it takes 43 gallons of sap to make 1 gallon of syrup.  Lower than 2% takes more sap, and greater than 2% takes less sap to equal 1 gallon of 66 Brix finished syrup.

Usually, the first sap of the season starts kinda high sugar content, maybe 2.3% with the sugar content of the sap spiking at the second or third run maybe up to 3%. Then each successive run has lower and lower sugar content until maybe down to 1.4% at the end of the season.  Healthy orchards with good crowns and proper spacing in good soil can average over 3.0% sugar.  The higher the sugar content, the less boiling per gallon. Less heating cost and less time.

The amount of science involved in sugarin' is endless. And fascinating!!

 There is no worse taste than syrup made from buddy sap!!  Blah….

 

Akwelder.    I'd love to exchange a pint of Maple syrup for a pint of your Alaskan birch syrup, just for the experience of trying it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been trying to find an oil fired arch for hobby use, but to no avail.  At least here in the Midwest.  Like to find something that could evaporate about 10-15 + gallons per hour.   My set up takes about 10 hours to boil down 50 gallons of sap, and would like to speed that process up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, M35A2 said:

I've been trying to find an oil fired arch for hobby use, but to no avail.  At least here in the Midwest.  Like to find something that could evaporate about 10-15 + gallons per hour.   My set up takes about 10 hours to boil down 50 gallons of sap, and would like to speed that process up. 

Leader Evaporator has a Midwest store and distributors all over the place, they make a fine product with EXCELLENT support. 

 

NH, we've been running very low sugar content this year, averaging about 1.7and holding steady all year. It's been grueling to at the least. Tonight is my first night getting to bed before 2 am in a week. It does begin to wear on a person... why is this fun?😉🔫

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info vtfireman85.   Funny thing is I just got a Leader catalog in the mail and an invite to their open house in Wisconsin.  Might have to make the journey up that way. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/22/2017 at 10:34 PM, vtfireman85 said:

Leader Evaporator has a Midwest store and distributors all over the place, they make a fine product with EXCELLENT support. 

 

NH, we've been running very low sugar content this year, averaging about 1.7and holding steady all year. It's been grueling to at the least. Tonight is my first night getting to bed before 2 am in a week. It does begin to wear on a person... why is this fun?😉🔫

Because every drop you taste will show you why you do this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, MTO said:

Because every drop you taste will show you why you do this.

Trouble is, I don't really like it. Too sweet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

Trouble is, I don't really like it. Too sweet. 

Well, they say there is something wrong with you...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes MTO, there is something wrong with me. No run today so I made some candy to take care of some people who have been after me to do some. 

Pardon the groceries, we do a lot of cracker food this time of year😉Saves much time and wards off starvation 

IMG_3311.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎22‎/‎03‎/‎2017 at 9:39 PM, NHrediron said:

1066lover and VTfireman, we must have similar number of taps.   I run about 1000 taps, all 5/16" health spouts.  All on gravity lines.

 I have a 4'x14' lightning evaporator, oil fired.     I burn 14 gallons of heating oil per hour, but make about 5 to 5.5 gallons of syrup per hour.  As well, I am in the range of 150 to 250 gallons per year.

 

 For others, the name "Sugar Maple" is a misnomer. The tree that people often call sugar maples are actually "Rock Maple."      There are 4 species of trees that are members of the sugar maple family: Rock, Red, Black, and Silver.   Here in the Northeast we don't have many, if any Black Maple. But we sure have a lot of Rocks and Reds.  Of my 1000 taps, I may only tap a dozen red maples, and no silvers.   I only tap the red maples if my lines happen to travel right by them. Otherwise, their lesser sugar content and their earlier finish to the season (tree budding out earlier)  having bad sap can spoil a whole tank worth of good Rock Maple sap.

 Rock Maples By far have the highest sugar content.   If you collect sap that is 2.0% sugar, then it takes 43 gallons of sap to make 1 gallon of syrup.  Lower than 2% takes more sap, and greater than 2% takes less sap to equal 1 gallon of 66 Brix finished syrup.

Usually, the first sap of the season starts kinda high sugar content, maybe 2.3% with the sugar content of the sap spiking at the second or third run maybe up to 3%. Then each successive run has lower and lower sugar content until maybe down to 1.4% at the end of the season.  Healthy orchards with good crowns and proper spacing in good soil can average over 3.0% sugar.  The higher the sugar content, the less boiling per gallon. Less heating cost and less time.

The amount of science involved in sugarin' is endless. And fascinating!!

 There is no worse taste than syrup made from buddy sap!!  Blah….

 

Akwelder.    I'd love to exchange a pint of Maple syrup for a pint of your Alaskan birch syrup, just for the experience of trying it.

Then what is Mountain Maple? Is it just another term for Rock Maple. I have heard both terms used and thought they were the same. Or am I wrong? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

George

One way to tell is crown shape, another is leaves, soft maple is a somewhat generic term to refer to red maple and several other deferent varieties, mountain maple has a jagged leaf with main lobes, and is properly known as acre spicatum. 

Sugar or rock maple is properly acre saccharum 

red maple would be acer rubrum

and silver maple would be acer saccharinum

black maple would be acer nigrum, 

these are the most common maples around the northern us and probably southern Canada of the bunch sugar and black maple are most closely related, when referring to soft maple around here most of the time people are talking about red maple which does not run as sweet and often buds out earlier than sugar maple causing foul sap, if it's on buckets, no big deal, you just pull the tap. If it's on pipeline it'll lower the quality of the whole tank once it turns buddy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now