ihrondiesel

7240 High EGT's

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1 hour ago, ihrondiesel said:

Lol!  That’s what I thought when I re-read the comments above. 

Sorry to see your trouble but that is something that should not have happened or no excuse for it. Common sense either you put recon rods in or definitely change studs or bolts. You can feel with enough experience if threads are pulling or bolt not tightening right. Brings back a hot rod magazine article once about their dyno testing of a chevy small block. They did their usual stuff and after 3 or 4 dyno runs at 400 hp they broke a rod bolt. Then an article about measuring rod bolt stretch instead. The way you sound they will warranty it though.

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Ouch!

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I talked to the service manager at the dealership the other day after they took the engine out. He said one of the new rod bolts apparently broke. 

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please explain how the dealer knew he was at 80% load  and could calculate out 285 hp If you don't measure full output how do you know what 80 percent of full output is? I am in unfamilial territory here.

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That’s a mystery to me as well. The tech that worked on it told me the other day that he had it pulled down to 900 rpm on the dyno after the overhaul, so he was pretty sure it wasn’t something he did. But that sounds like more than an 80% load to me. The horsepower figures they gave me were 230 hp at 80% load, I did the calculation to come up with 285 (230/4 = 57.5. 57.5 x 5 = 287.5). Maybe someone with more experience can chime and and explain how they would come up with the 80% load figure. 

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Just now, jass1660 said:

You missed by six months bud!

Six months?  To quote another member "That sounds like Gubmint Math!"

But all joking aside, that is a lousy thing to have happen after an overhaul.

Glass half full, at least it is still under warranty!!

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1 hour ago, ihrondiesel said:

That’s a mystery to me as well. The tech that worked on it told me the other day that he had it pulled down to 900 rpm on the dyno after the overhaul, so he was pretty sure it wasn’t something he did. But that sounds like more than an 80% load to me. The horsepower figures they gave me were 230 hp at 80% load, I did the calculation to come up with 285 (230/4 = 57.5. 57.5 x 5 = 287.5). Maybe someone with more experience can chime and and explain how they would come up with the 80% load figure. 

I think your tech is talking a lot. 900rpm from 2400 is a lot of load  on a new engine. Just from the picture it was an expensive mistake I would be surprised if he gets to keep his job.

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16 minutes ago, dale560 said:

I think your tech is talking a lot. 900rpm from 2400 is a lot of load  on a new engine. Just from the picture it was an expensive mistake I would be surprised if he gets to keep his job.

Keep his job? Probably be promoted to service manager now

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Maybe just me but I would have a fit if someone pulled my freshly rebuilt engine down to 900 rpm like that.  Got to be pretty careful running in an overhauled engine vs a new engine where there is a good chance the initial run in was done at the factory where the engine was built.  

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I think there is a faint smell of BS somewhere in the air. Also I was at a CaseIH service school when the magnums came out and they didn,t want a new tractor on a shop dyno for the first 50 hrs

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On 12/7/2017 at 3:56 PM, dale560 said:

Sorry to see your trouble but that is something that should not have happened or no excuse for it. Common sense either you put recon rods in or definitely change studs or bolts. You can feel with enough experience if threads are pulling or bolt not tightening right. Brings back a hot rod magazine article once about their dyno testing of a chevy small block. They did their usual stuff and after 3 or 4 dyno runs at 400 hp they broke a rod bolt. Then an article about measuring rod bolt stretch instead. The way you sound they will warranty it though.

Agree, I started stretching rod bolts 20 years ago much more accurate than an torque wrench, and quickly identifies bad bolts.

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4 hours ago, ihrondiesel said:

That’s a mystery to me as well. The tech that worked on it told me the other day that he had it pulled down to 900 rpm on the dyno after the overhaul, so he was pretty sure it wasn’t something he did. But that sounds like more than an 80% load to me. The horsepower figures they gave me were 230 hp at 80% load, I did the calculation to come up with 285 (230/4 = 57.5. 57.5 x 5 = 287.5). Maybe someone with more experience can chime and and explain how they would come up with the 80% load figure. 

Maybe it was 1900 RPM.  That sounds more reasonable.  When we break a tractor in we get it under load and try to pull it down 50 to 100 RPM’s under PTO speed and hold it there for four or five hours.  We don’t have a dyno so we use a manure pump.

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7 minutes ago, peanut said:

Agree, I started stretching rod bolts 20 years ago much more accurate than an torque wrench, and quickly identifies bad bolts.

Just my thoughts from seeing picture. Very rarely to people change studs on connecting rods. The thought is if bolts swap always and studs with nuts are okay to reuse. Just from experience when tech overhauled it stud head was cocked and not in place and worked lose in a few hours. Almost any customer engine now gets rebuilt rods so you have new bushings and studs installed. There is a checklist I always follow before oil pan goes one. Numbers on rods and mains line up correspond, arrows or bearing tangs right way. Rods slide back and forth by hand and all stud heads or bolts are seated right. The hot rod article was from years ago and I think 3000 dollars worth of parts went up in a scrap heap from a stretched or non tightened rod bolt. 

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I would guess that he referred to pulling it down from 1000 rpm PTO to 900 RPM PTO? 

Either way horsepower can only be measured correctly at the exact speed of the PTO not over or under the correct RPM

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