Dave Downs

Milk Tanker Question

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We're in the middle of a heat wave (again!) and I was following a milk tanker up the road and for some reason thought about the milk heating-up during transport. Are those tanks insulated or are the travel times short enough that heating (or freezing in the winter) is not a problem?

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Tanks are insulated, plus that milk is suppose to be below 40 degrees when picked up. We always tried to have it cooled down to 34 or so, use to have ice in it! I loved cold raw milk!

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Insulated well. Will keep a load of milk within 2 degrees of the temp when it leaves the Midwest to when it arrives in California. No refridgeration equip. Just insulation. 

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I never knew about the superb insulation, but I have another question. A long time ago someone told me milk truck tanks have no baffles due to the difficulty in cleaning the baffles. Is there any truth to that?
 Thanks!

DWF

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There isn't even refrigeration on the semi tankers that the big daries store their milk in.  It goes through a couple coolers and straight to the tank.  It is stored in there for a day without any additional cooling.

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1 minute ago, 1480x3 said:

That's correct, no baffles.

We ship in a single compartment 6000 gallon tank but I was thinking some of the trailers had two compartments? 

But no baffles 

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1 minute ago, 1480x3 said:

That's correct, no baffles.

Yes, nothing food grade does b/c its surface that can become dirty.  So slug slug down the road we go!  Local guys tried suto shifts...the sloosh confused the computer.

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No baffles, you time your shifts with the slosh of the milk.  There have been several tankers tip over while shifting lanes on the highway that were only half full.  When the tanks are full they haul nice.  Here in Michigan the big haulers carry 90000 lbs of milk.

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6 hours ago, bitty said:

We ship in a single compartment 6000 gallon tank but I was thinking some of the trailers had two compartments? 

But no baffles 

Have a buddy that drives for local co-op and he said they have 2 compartments on some trailers, will load front first to provide better traction in winter. 

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1 hour ago, new guy said:

They haul 90,000 or gross 90,000?

90 net.     When I hauled milk I put in 112 thou in the tank  163 gross the fuller the tank the less room the product had to move

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1 hour ago, JOE MI said:

90 net.     When I hauled milk I put in 112 thou in the tank  163 gross the fuller the tank the less room the product had to move

How many axles did you have? I know Michigan runs alot of them depending on the load. Also what kind of power did you have? Back when I drove in the 90s we finally graduated to Big Cam 4s rated at 350 pulling 6000gal. Seems small today, but sure was better than the Brigadier"s with 238s or 6v92s!

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trailers that come here have had 2 compartments for years. maybe a fuction of more smaller farms= sloshing forever to get one big compartment full. more sloshing= possible lower quality (think churning).

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more sloshing= possible lower quality (think churning).

Oooops, we have a load of butter!  Thats going to be fun to unload!? :)

 

 

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Image result for milky way trucks

Here is the latest incarnation of our area hauler.  105500 which here is 71000#s of milk from my tank.  Never seen a straight truck in my 42 years.

Image result for milky way trucks

 

 This is the 1st trailer unit they found and restored.  60s iirc?  

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The biggest trailers have 9 axles, I was thinking they are plated for 155,000 lbs so that would be more than 90,000 lbs of milk.  Most of the tractors hooked onto them are 550 horse.

One year our farm truck was down so we borrowed their spare Pete, it hauled our full hopper bottom like nothing was there, I remember pulling hills and gaining speed!

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5 hours ago, 856 Custom said:

How many axles did you have? I know Michigan runs alot of them depending on the load. Also what kind of power did you have? Back when I drove in the 90s we finally graduated to Big Cam 4s rated at 350 pulling 6000gal. Seems small today, but sure was better than the Brigadier"s with 238s or 6v92s!

That would've been a 8 axle trl with a brand new  06 ken worth t800 with a cat c15 set at 475😞 because 550 used so much more fuel (so I was told) we are allowed 160 thou in mich when I pull the doubles I would gross 173 hauling the same 110 thou in milk 

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Those are way more truck than the 1700 LOADSTAR OR THE C700  I was familiar  we owned an A130 also but that was a can truck !& inch tires you did not have to lift the cans so high. my uncle had a co-loadstar with a bulk tank donot remember the size of tank think it had the mighty 345 engine though

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In this area there aren't many split tank tankers, most of them around here are 6000 to 7000 gallon single tanks. As the others have said, they won't take on much heat, and the tank itself won't freeze in the winter, but the lid and the valve will freeze pretty hard if the temperature drops much below 0 degrees. Thawing frozen milk out of the valve is a cold, wet, messy job! Usually you get a pretty good milk bath when they let go!

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Interesting point about the lack of baffles.  When I was a kid circa 1970 visiting my Grandfather's dairy farm I got to ride to the dairy in the tanker after it picked up his milk.  It was a mint green Ford cabover six wheeler.  After picking up one or two more farms we unloaded at Modern Dairy in Saint Marys PA.  The most memorable part of the ride was the sloshing which I recall as being quite dramatic.  Left an impression on me as a 10 yr old kid!

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   This is the truck I pulled milk tanks with back in '02 and '03. Most of the tanks I pulled were 6800 gal. cap. and no baffles. Which is totally different from crude oil tanks which can have up to 8 baffles.

mts-%20portales_zpseygv4fzp.jpg

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I once heard the tanks can only be used for so long before they have to be replaced? Several local contractors have old milk tanks being used on jobsite water trucks, I'd think the insulated stainless tank would be a little expensive for such use.

22 hours ago, JOE MI said:

That would've been a 8 axle trl with a brand new  06 ken worth t800 with a cat c15 set at 475😞 because 550 used so much more fuel (so I was told) we are allowed 160 thou in mich when I pull the doubles I would gross 173 hauling the same 110 thou in milk 

Interesting, most of the Cat powered truck owners I deal with report an increase in fuel economy going to the 550 HP rating. Most people bought the C15's at 475 HP and ran them there until warranty was up, then re-rated to 550 because there was a substantial cost savings vs buying the engine set at 550 from the factory. The 475 was the lowest rating that could be flashed to 550 without changing any iron.

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1 hour ago, Cattech said:

I once heard the tanks can only be used for so long before they have to be replaced? Several local contractors have old milk tanks being used on jobsite water trucks, I'd think the insulated stainless tank would be a little expensive for such use.

Interesting, most of the Cat powered truck owners I deal with report an increase in fuel economy going to the 550 HP rating. Most people bought the C15's at 475 HP and ran them there until warranty was up, then re-rated to 550 because there was a substantial cost savings vs buying the engine set at 550 from the factory. The 475 was the lowest rating that could be flashed to 550 without changing any iron.

Yes and no.  They are cheap when un-certifiable.  They get cracks and food grade does not allow welds where milk touches.  And how can you weld with insulation behind?  Not like leak weld but hair line.  Notice our hauled has no frame for wt savings.  The barrel is doing all the work.  They are stainless with a layer of insulation then white powder coated aluminum skinned.  Lighter and cheaper to build.  They build their own.

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