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Found 3 results

  1. Long story short, I had my 113 in my B rebuilt in a machine shop that is high volume and does reputable work. They left the push rods out because I was going to try and find another valve train assembly off of another B that a friend of mine had. I found one, took it off and brought it home, put the push rods in- numbered and re-installed in trhe same order they came out- and this is the result. Are the gaps the result of my not having turned the crankshaft enough, thus creating rhe gaps between the tops of the push rods and the cups on the tappets? I grew up with Moline equipment and never worked in IH tractors until recently. Anybody have any ideas? I have other questions about timing marks on timing gear and governor, but I'll save that for another posting. Any help is most welcome and appreciated.
  2. 1940 B Rebuild

    First, let me thank everyone in advance because I would have never decided to tackle this project without previous help in this forum on another tractor. That being said, let me pose my questions with some background. I have a 1940 B, serial # F.A.B. 40150 that arrived on our farm close to 20 years ago after a neighbor traded it to my dad for some work. Long story short, it's been sitting for nearly 18 years and is now in my barn in pieces. I have the engine apart and crank and block both sitting in electrolysis tubs, and will hot tank them probably in the next week or so, including the governor, carburetor, and everything else engine-related that I can get into the tank to clean up. Suffice to say that this will be a pretty thorough refurbishment since I plan to put this tractor back into light duty cultivating our garden and small jobs around the place. So, here's the fun part: 1) I don't see a problem with buying a complete overhaul kit that includes valves, gaskets, etc. Or should I not? I've never done this before so I'm asking the experts, here; this will be my first engine overhaul, but I've grown up working on equipment, have toolboxes for of tools, and a nice barn/shop to do this in, so why not. If you had to buy a rebuild kit, whose would you buy and your thoughts on the product(s). 2) I've also read that step-head pistons are better if a tractor is going to be working. It may wind up in our local parade, but that's once a year- the rest of the time it'll be wearing double-row cultivators or pulling a planter. What are the pros and cons of step-head pistons? 3) The radiator: while taking it off, one bolt on the left side (while sitting on the tractor) was rusted smooth off and pretty much disintigrated when I took the radiator off. The other broke the whole piece of cast-iron off from the block that it was bolted to when it came off. I'm thinking it had already stress-fractured at some point, but nevertheless, it's off. Can a good radiator shop replace those bolts in the bottom, or am I looking at a new radiator because of that issue? When I drained the radiator, it was still green and was not leaking anywhere, so at least I know the core is still in good shape. I'd like to get some answers before I start buying parts this week, and I wanted to bring my concerns here because I trust the folks in this forum and value your opinions.
  3. Figured I would throw this out there as it applies to pretty much all these old engine builds and there is lots of experience here. I am restoring an Oliver 70 that I got as a basket case that already had the engine mostly torn apart. I have it pulled down the the block to check everything and found that the number one rod journal has some just visible grooves in it that I can just barely feel if I use my fingernail. I have heard if it is that minor you can polish the journal rather than have the crank machined? I have a local place that can do polishing but it has to be sent out to be turned which I would like to avoid with a hard to find crank. I have had some people just say get some emery cloth or fine paper and oil and do it myself but I definitely plan to at least have it professionally polished to make sure it stays in round. So, with all the experience here should I just polish and put it together with standard bearings (obviously still checking specs and clearance), or does the crank have to be machined and order some under-size bearings? It is just going to be a show tractor; will go to a few shows and parades a year and I may take it back to the farm to rake hay for a little run time but its not going to live a hard life or get many hours which is why I figured I might be able to just polish it since it will be light use and I know these old tractors aren't nearly as picky on being to perfectly tight specs like the new engines being it's a lower compression low speed gas. Thanks for any opinions.