Ben Towe

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About Ben Towe

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 05/20/1985

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Lafayette, TN
  • Interests
    Farming, tools, guns, IH equipment.

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  1. Tough looking 1456 puller with tricycle frontend

    That's nice. I've got a 1456 with a tricycle front end, albeit not nearly that pretty. What part of South Central Kentucky are you from Hydro 70? We own a couple of farms in Allen County. I might need to buy some equipment from you sometime.
  2. Vintage Ads

    That looks very similar to the knife drive on a 515 Ford mower as well. It was okay, but the old 501 with a pitman arm was a bit more rugged and reliable.
  3. IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Thank you Ben... Sometimes I wonder about myself and often lose track of things. I sometimes wonder if I'll be able to keep this thread going, being leather strapped into a bed at the state hospital at Warm Springs? I may have to give it up. Gary Don't feel bad, I had to look it up to refresh my memory!
  4. IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Gary, you are correct about White, it is the same company that produced White trucks and, eventually, White tractors through their subsidiary White Farm Equipment.
  5. Hi Ben,

    I was reading your post on alternative fuels. I run my 664 on cooking grease from the local Chinese restaurant. 40 gal cooking oil, 4 gal kerosene, 3 gal reg gas, and half a bottle of Diesel Kleen from Walmart. The Diesel Kleen takes the place of the magic mystery additive. I used an old sump pump on a rope with a hose to a whole house water filter and open top 55 gal drums.

    ...

  6. Learning alot, but want more info

    I don't know about "official" dates but I believe the last International tractor rolled out of the Farmall plant on May 26, 1985, a hand built 5488 MFWD.
  7. Learning alot, but want more info

    And the economy of the time. And their huge production capabilities which translated into huge overhead in a time when the Farmall plant could produce every tractor sold on the continent in a year in a couple weeks of hard running. That goes back to poor management though. They should have moved the Farmall plant to a smaller, more efficient facility in the early to mid 70s and even that would have been late in the game. Survival in anything requires the ability to change and adapt, and that didn't happen at IH until it was too late, if at all.
  8. Learning alot, but want more info

    You are right about that. J.I. Case was already through as its own company well before the downfall of IH. I'd say that Tenneco was as desperate to buy the Ag Division as International was to sell it. Without knowing the numbers I'd say that the Case tractors had virtually no market share by the mid 80s and they were operating the company without making any money to speak of. They needed IHs market share even though they had to reorganize the company. They simply had the capital to do it and IH did not. That's just my thoughts on it.
  9. Learning alot, but want more info

    Maybe you're just lucky or something but I've never seen a Case that was anything but trouble. A lot of the big tobacco farmers around here buy them because they're so cheap. Usually they ain't worth it. Apparently they inherited quality control and innovation from IH, of course many of the first CaseIH tractors were rebadged IHs so the quality got a major boost right off the bat. I always thought it was a shame the IH name had to take a back seat to Case though. You got it backwards Ben,the first Case-IH tractors offered for sale were re-badged Case tractors that were painted red. Take a look at a 685 or an 885 sometime. The only thing that says Case International on them is the badge on the side. Every other part is stamped IH. They are a rebadged 84 series. Let me clarify my statement, I was referring to over 100hp tractors. I am not as familiar with those. We have a 5230 at work which would be the closest to that range I know a lot about. I think its around 100 horse. I'm more of a 56 series man myself, as you can see from my signature.
  10. Learning alot, but want more info

    Maybe you're just lucky or something but I've never seen a Case that was anything but trouble. A lot of the big tobacco farmers around here buy them because they're so cheap. Usually they ain't worth it. Apparently they inherited quality control and innovation from IH, of course many of the first CaseIH tractors were rebadged IHs so the quality got a major boost right off the bat. I always thought it was a shame the IH name had to take a back seat to Case though. You got it backwards Ben,the first Case-IH tractors offered for sale were re-badged Case tractors that were painted red. Take a look at a 685 or an 885 sometime. The only thing that says Case International on them is the badge on the side. Every other part is stamped IH. They are a rebadged 84 series.
  11. IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Ben, Thank you for posting and showing us your IH Tractors on a Kentucky Farm! I'm glad you appreciate this conglomeration of history. (Books are ususally quite organized, you know!) My cousins have a 656 Hydro so I know what they are. The 1456... I was working at Bourke Motor & Implement (IH Dealer) in Lewistown not long after the 1456 was replaced. The only TD-9s I was ever around were the old type (the old one had a Bosch pump!). I ran a TD-25 new style and a neighbor had a TD-15 new style, so I'm sort of familiar with them. That'd be a fun one to own. I'll bet you get it going! OBG, I hope so. It will be a nice addition to the farm. Anyway, here are a few more pictures of my old 1456 around the farm. The one on the left was taken yesterday after I took the loader off of it. The right one is my cattle partner Kenneth running it while I take a short break. The trees you see laid over in the background were pushed out by that tractor. The middle one is my attempt at disking the ground where those trees were when it was too wet.
  12. IH Tractors on Montana Farm

    Old Binder Guy, Thank you for starting this marvelous thread, if you can even call it that anymore. I have barely scratched the surface but the amount of information here would rival many books written on the subject. I thought I would add a few IH Tractors on a Kentucky Farm to the mix. These were all taken recently of the old tractors we still use everyday around here. I know they're not so old to some of you old timers (and I mean that with no disrespect) but the newest is the the 1456 at far right with the loader at a spry 40 years old (1970 model), the 656 is a 1965 model, and I'm unsure about about the TD-9 in the center though from what I can tell it's a 60-something model. I haven't got it running yet.
  13. Learning alot, but want more info

    Maybe you're just lucky or something but I've never seen a Case that was anything but trouble. A lot of the big tobacco farmers around here buy them because they're so cheap. Usually they ain't worth it. Apparently they inherited quality control and innovation from IH, of course many of the first CaseIH tractors were rebadged IHs so the quality got a major boost right off the bat. I always thought it was a shame the IH name had to take a back seat to Case though.