Cattech

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About Cattech

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 02/01/1977

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Clear Lake, MN
  • Interests
    Yellow, Red, and Green diesel tech - old and new
    Corvettes
    Sleds and ATVs
    Cub Cadets, I run a 2165 currently

    in Pa's shed - IH 3788, H, '78 1460, 815 corn & soybean special - no more, he finally sold the old girl to some guy near Rochester, MN! JD 4320, 3010, Case 1845C


    and now, a Link Belt 4300C !@#$%^
    As if I needed another thing to fix...
  1. We usually call it stop-work. Best way to find out what replacing every component of your A/C system costs. Also, once added, if a service tech tests your system before hooking up to it and finds stop leak products in the freon loop, they most likely won't work on it because it destroys their recovery and service equipment. It is a shop rule at my workplace to test every machine before hooking up. Best bet is to fix the leaks properly, with a little shopping most parts aren't too expensive.
  2. Be sure you put a gauge on and check cranking fuel pressure before chasing electrical too far. It doesn't sound like this should be the issue but stranger things have happened. If it doesn't have 15+ PSI it wouldn't even sputter.
  3. Been burned on Paccars like this, some trucks had a single separate wire clamped straight to the battery for ecm power. It hangs off in a way so unless your really looking you don't see it, and when the batteries get unhooked it falls down behind them and doesn't get hooked back up. No battery in ecm to go dead, but I have seen them lose their flash file for no reason. Also no fuel shutoff, if the truck came from the oil fields there could be an air shutoff, but unlikely. Couple things that may help..... Ignition Keyswitch Circuit and Battery Supply Circuit - Test SMCS - 1401-038; 1553-038 System Operation Description: This procedure tests whether proper voltage is being supplied to the Engine Control Module (ECM). Note: The "Vehicle Voltage Selection" parameter determines the upper limit and the lower limit for battery voltage, that is used in order to trip the diagnostic codes for battery power. The options for programming are 12 volt or 24 volt. Typically, the parameter is set at the Caterpillar manufacturer, based on the engine order. Installing a new ECM will require the "Vehicle Voltage Selection" parameter to be programmed for the appropriate system voltage. "Vehicle Voltage Selection" will be displayed beneath the 253-02 diagnostic code, until the "Vehicle Voltage Selection" is programmed. Use this procedure to troubleshoot the system when one of the following diagnostic codes is active or easily repeated: 43-2 Key Switch Fault 168-2 ECM Battery Power Intermittent 168-3 High ECU Battery Power 168-4 Low ECU Battery Power Also, use this procedure if you have been directed from Troubleshooting, "Electronic Service Tool Will Not Communicate with ECM" or Troubleshooting, "Engine Cranks but Will Not Start". The ECM receives electrical power (battery voltage) through the wiring that is supplied by the vehicle manufacturer. Unswitched battery voltage is supplied to terminals P1-48, P1-52, and P1-53 at the J1/P1 ECM connectors. The negative battery is supplied to terminals P1-63, P1-65, and P1-67 at the J1/P1 ECM connectors. The ECM receives the input from the keyswitch at terminal P1-70 while the keyswitch is in the ON position or the START position. When the ECM detects battery voltage at the keyswitch input, the ECM powers up. When battery voltage is removed from this input, the ECM powers down. The cause of an intermittent power supply to the ECM can occur on either the positive side or on the negative side of the battery circuit. The three connections for the unswitched +Battery must be routed through a dedicated protection device (circuit breaker). Some vehicles may be equipped with an engine protection shutdown system or an idle timer shutdown system that interrupts electrical power to the keyswitch. The engine protection shutdown system can be an aftermarket device and the idle timer shutdown system can be external to the ECM. Some of these systems will not supply power to the ECM until one of the following conditions is met: The engine is cranked. The engine oil pressure achieves acceptable limits. An override button is pressed. Keep in mind that these devices may be the cause of intermittent power to the ECM. These devices may unexpectedly shut down the engine. Usually, the vehicle will be wired so that the battery power for the service tool connector will be independent of the keyswitch. Therefore, the communications adapter may be able to power up, but the communications adapter may not be able to establish communications with the ECM. The ECM requires the keyswitch to be in the ON position in order to maintain communications. The ECM may power down a short time after connecting Caterpillar Electronic Technician (ET) if thekeyswitch is in the OFF position. This is normal. For intermittent problems such as intermittent shutdowns that could be caused by vehicle wiring, temporarily bypassing the vehicle wiring may be an effective means of determining the root cause. If the symptoms disappear with the bypass wiring, the vehicle wiring is the cause of the problem. A means of bypassing vehicle wiring is explained in this test procedure. This is especially important for vehicles that do not provide dedicated circuits for the unswitched battery and the connections for the keyswitch. View Image Illustration 1 g01329817 Schematic for ECM battery circuit Test Step 1. Inspect the Electrical Connectors and the Wiring View Image Illustration 2 g01329803 Location of the J1/P1 ECM connectors (typical left side engine view) Thoroughly inspect the J1/P1 ECM connector and the firewall bulkhead connectors. Refer to Troubleshooting, "Electrical Connectors - Inspect" for details. View Image Illustration 3 g01387466 Terminal locations at the P1 ECM connector for the keyswitch and battery supply circuit (P1-48) Unswitched +Battery (P1-52) Unswitched +Battery (P1-53) Unswitched +Battery (P1-63) −Battery (P1-65) −Battery (P1-67) −Battery (P1-70) Keyswitch Perform a 45 N (10 lb) pull test on each of the wires in the ECM connector that are associated with the circuit for the keyswitch and the battery. Check the allen head screw for each of the ECM connectors for the proper torque. Refer to Troubleshooting, "Electrical Connectors - Inspect" for the correct torque values. Check the harness and wiring for abrasion and for pinch points from the battery to the ECM, and from the keyswitch to the ECM. Expected Result: All connectors, pins and sockets are completely coupled and/or inserted and the harness and wiring are free of corrosion, of abrasion and of pinch points. Results: OK - The harness and connectors appear to be OK. Proceed to Test Step 2. Not OK - There is a problem with the connectors and/or wiring. Repair: Repair the connectors or wiring and/or replace the connectors or wiring. Ensure that all of the seals are properly in place and ensure that the connectors are completely coupled. Verify that the repair eliminates the problem. STOP Test Step 2. Use Cat ET to Check for Communications with the ECM Connect Cat ET to the service tool connector. Turn the keyswitch to the ON position. Establish communications with the engine ECM. Note: Wait at least 30 seconds in order for Cat ET to establish communications. Expected Result: Cat ET is communicating with the engine ECM. Results: OK - Cat ET is communicating with the engine ECM. Proceed to Test Step 3. Not OK - Cat ET will not establish communications with the engine ECM. Proceed to Test Step 4. Test Step 3. Check for Active Diagnostic Codes or Logged Diagnostic Codes Connect Cat ET to the service tool connector. Turn the keyswitch to the ON position. Monitor the active diagnostic code screen on Cat ET. Check and record any active diagnostic codes or logged diagnostic codes. Note: Wait at least 30 seconds in order for the diagnostic codes to become active. Expected Result: One of the following diagnostic codes is active or logged: 43-2 Key Switch Fault 168-0 Excessive ECM Battery Power 168-1 Low ECM Battery Power 168-2 ECM Battery Power Intermittent Note: A 43-2 code can be generated by rapidly cycling the keyswitch. If the 43-2 Key Switch Fault is logged but not active, this may be the cause. Results: OK - A 43-2, 168-0, 168-1, or 168-2 diagnostic code is active or logged. Proceed to Test Step 4. Not OK - No diagnostic code is active. Repair: The problem is no longer present. There may be an intermittent electrical problem in the harness or in a connector. If an intermittent problem is suspected, refer to Troubleshooting, "Electrical Connectors - Inspect" for information that is related to troubleshooting intermittent electrical problems. STOP Test Step 4. Check for Battery Voltage at the ECM Connector Disconnect the J1/P1 ECM connectors. Turn the keyswitch to the ON position. Measure the voltage between P1-48 (unswitched +Battery) and P1-63 (-Battery). Measure the voltage between P1-52 (unswitched +Battery) and P1-65 (-Battery). Measure the voltage between P1-53 (unswitched +Battery) and P1-67 (-Battery). Measure the voltage between P1-70 (keyswitch) and P1-67 (-Battery). Turn the keyswitch to the OFF position. Expected Result: For 12 Volt Systems, the measured voltage is a constant 11.0 to 13.5 VDC with no suspected intermittent problems at this time. For 24 Volt Systems, the measured voltage is a constant 22.0 to 27.0 VDC with no suspected intermittent problems at this time. Results: OK - The ECM is receiving the correct voltage. Repair: If an intermittent condition is suspected, refer to Troubleshooting, "Electrical Connectors - Inspect". STOP Not OK - Keyswitch - No voltage is present on P1-70. Repair: Check for continuity in the wiring for the keyswitch from P1-70 through thekeyswitch circuit to the batteries. Check the circuit protection for the circuit. Refer to the vehicle service manual for instructions on troubleshooting the circuit for the keyswitch. For intermittent problems such as intermittent shutdowns that could be caused by vehicle wiring, temporarily bypassing the vehicle wiring may be an effective means of determining the root cause. Proceed to Test Step 6. Not OK - Unswitched +Battery - No voltage is present on P1-48, P1-52, or P1-53. Repair: Check for continuity in the wiring for the unswitched +Battery from the ECM to the batteries. Check the circuit protection for the circuit. Check for continuity in the wiring for the −Battery from the ECM to the batteries. For intermittent problems such as intermittent shutdowns that could be caused by vehicle wiring, temporarily bypassing the vehicle wiring may be an effective means of determining the root cause. Proceed to Test Step 6. Not OK - Battery Voltage is out of range - Proceed to Test Step 5. Test Step 5. Check the Batteries Measure no-load battery voltage at the battery posts. Load test the batteries. Use the 4C-4911 Battery Load Tester. Refer to Special Instruction, SEHS9249, "Use of 4C-4911 Battery Load Tester for 6, 8 and 12 Volt Lead Acid Batteries" and Special Instruction, SEHS7633, "Battery Test Procedure". Expected Result: The batteries pass the load test. For 12 Volt systems, the measured voltage is at least 11.0. For 24 Volt systems, the measured voltage is at least 22.0. Results: OK - The batteries pass the load test. For 12 Volt systems, the measured voltage is at least 11.0. For 24 Volt systems, the measured voltage is at least 22.0. Repair: Refer to the vehicle service manual for instructions on troubleshooting the vehicle wiring harness. Troubleshoot the vehicle wiring harness and repair the vehicle wiring harness, as required. Verify that the repairs eliminate the problem. STOP Not OK - The batteries do not pass the load test. For 12 Volt systems, the measured voltage is less than 11.0. For 24 Volt systems, the measured voltage is less than 22.0. Repair: Recharge or replace the faulty batteries. Verify that the repair eliminates the problem. STOP Test Step 6. Bypass the Vehicle Harness Batteries give off flammable fumes which can explode. To avoid injury or death, do not strike a match, cause a spark, or smoke in the vicinity of a battery. NOTICE Do not connect the bypass harness to the battery until all three of the 10 Amp in-line fuses have been removed from the +Battery line. If the fuses are not removed before connection to the battery a spark may result. Note: This bypass harness is only for test applications. This bypass harness must be removed before the vehicle is released to the customer. The bypass harness can be used in order to determine if the cause of the intermittent problem is interruptions in battery power to the ECM or to the keyswitch circuit. Turn the keyswitch to the OFF position. Disconnect the J1/P1 ECM connector. Connect the bypass harness to the ECM: Connect the 70-pin connector of the 167-9225 Harness (SERVICE TOOL ADAPTER) to the J1 ECM connector. Connect the 9-pin connector for the adapter cable to the data link connector that is for Cat ET. Remove all three of the 10 Amp in-line fuses from the +Battery wire. Note: This bypass directly connects the circuit for the keyswitch to the ECM. The ECM will remain powered until the connection to the unswitched battery line "+" is disconnected. Remove all three of the 10 Amp in-line fuses from the in-line fuse holder to power down the ECM. Do not connect the bypass to the battery posts or do not remove the bypass from the battery posts without first removing the 10 Amp in-line fuses. Connect the red cable clamp to the +Battery terminal. Connect the black cable clamp to the −Battery terminal. Connect Cat ET to the data link connector of the bypass harness and verify that communication can be established. Note: Remove the bypass harness and restore all wiring to the original configuration after testing. Expected Result: Installing the bypass eliminates the problem. Note: The status of the "Ignition keyswitch" will always indicate "On" while the bypass harness is installed. Results: OK - The symptoms disappear when the bypass harness is installed. Also, the symptoms return when the bypass harness is removed. The problem is in the vehicle wiring that supplies power to the ECM. Check for aftermarket engine protection switches that interrupt power. Send the vehicle to the OEM dealer to repair. STOP Not OK - Repair: Connect the bypass to another battery and verify if the problem is resolved. If the problem is resolved, the problem is with the vehicle batteries. If the problem still exists, temporarily connect a test ECM. Remove all jumpers and replace all connectors. Recheck the system for active diagnostic codes and repeat this Test Step. If the problem is resolved with the test ECM, reconnect the suspect ECM. If the problem returns with the suspect ECM, replace the ECM. Refer to Troubleshooting, "Replacing the ECM". Verify that the repair eliminates the problem. STOP Cranks but Will Not Start SMCS - 1000-035 Probable Causes Theft deterrent Diagnostic codes ECM flash file Air inlet shutoff (if equipped) Engine speed/timing signal Keyswitch Communications between the Engine Control Module (ECM) and the Cat® Electronic Technician (ET) Aftermarket engine protection devices Power to ECM Electrical connections to the electronic unit injectors Fuel supply Unit injectors Combustion problem Cold weather and problems with the starting aids Recommended Actions Theft Deterrent If the display screen on Messenger indicates that the theft deterrent is enabled, the theft deterrent passwords must be entered before the engine will start. Ensure that the theft deterrent (if equipped) is not active. Turn the keyswitch to ON. Observe the display screen on Messenger. Diagnostic Codes Check for active diagnostic codes. Connect Cat ET to the data link connector. Check for active diagnostic codes. Certain diagnostic codes will prevent the engine from starting. Troubleshoot any diagnostic codes that are present. Flash File for the Engine Control Module (ECM) Check that the latest version of the ECM flash file has been installed. Verify that the flash file that is installed matches the application. A new ECM is not programmed at the factory. The engine will not start until the ECM flash file is installed for the specific application. Also, the ECM will not communicate until the flash file has been installed. Use "WinFlash" to program a new ECM. Air Inlet Shutoff (If Equipped) Check the air inlet shutoff system. If the engine was shutdown due to the air inlet shutoff system, the air inlet shutoff needs to be manually reset. Engine Speed/timing Signal Check the engine speed/timing signal. Observe the engine rpm on Cat ET while the engine is being cranked. This observation may require Cat ET to be powered directly by the vehicle batteries. Or this observation may require Cat ET to be powered directly by a separate power source. Use the167-9225 Harness (SERVICE TOOL ADAPTER). If Cat ET displays 0 rpm and the engine is being cranked, there is a problem in the circuit for the primary engine speed/timing sensor. Or there is a problem with the secondary engine speed/timing sensor. Refer to Troubleshooting, "Engine Speed/Timing Sensor Circuit - Test". Note: Upon initial cranking, the status for engine speed may indicate that the engine speed signal is abnormal. This message will be replaced with an engine speed once the ECM is able to calculate a speed from the signal. If an engine rpm is present, check the sensor installation. If the sensor is not properly installed, the sensor may read engine speed but the sensor may not be able to sense the tooth pattern. The ability to detect the tooth pattern is necessary to determine the cylinder position. Engine rpm is present when the engine rpm is 50 rpm or more. Ensure that the timing reference gear is installed correctly. The engine will not start if the gear was installed backwards. Check for proper orientation between the crankshaft and camshaft drive gears. Correct the orientation and/or replace the drive gear, if necessary. Refer to the Disassembly and Assembly manual for the appropriate procedures. Keyswitch Use Cat ET to check the status of the keyswitch. Access the status for "Ignition Key Switch" in Cat ET. Slowly cycle the keyswitch on and off while the status of the keyswitch is being monitored. The status should indicate the state of the switch. If the ECM will not communicate and the keyswitch is in the ON position, refer to "Aftermarket Engine Protection Devices". Note: If the engine shutdown output is used, the status for the keyswitch may indicate that the switch is on. This indication may be on even though the keyswitch is in the OFF position. Communications Between the ECM and Cat ET Check the communications between the ECM and Cat ET. Ensure that the keyswitch is in the ON position. Attempt to access one of the status screens on Cat ET. If Cat ET indicates that the ECM will not communicate, go to "Aftermarket Engine Protection Devices". If the ECM communicates, go to "Power to the ECM". Aftermarket Engine Protection Devices Check aftermarket engine protection devices. These devices usually interrupt power to the ECM. This interruption will prevent communications between the ECM and Cat ET. Check for the correct installation of the aftermarket engine protection device. Check for the correct operation of the aftermarket engine protection device. Verify that the ECM is receiving the correct battery voltage. Power to the ECM Check the power supply connections for the ECM and the ground connections for the ECM. Verify that the ECM is receiving battery voltage with the keyswitch in the ON position. Refer to Troubleshooting, "Ignition Key Switch Circuit and Battery Supply Circuit - Test". Check for proper operation of the ECM. Before replacing the ECM, try to install a new flash file into the existing ECM. Refer to Troubleshooting, "Flash Programming". If the ECM is suspected of being the problem, temporarily connect a test ECM. This temporary connection will prove whether the problem is with the suspect ECM. Electrical Connections to the Electronic Unit Injectors Check the electrical connections to the electronic unit injectors. Ensure that the valve cover connectors are fully connected. Ensure that the valve cover connectors are free of corrosion and of moisture. Fuel Supply Check the fuel supply. Monitor the exhaust for smoke while the engine is being cranked. Note: If no smoke is present, there may be a problem with the fuel quality or with the fuel supply. Check the fuel quality. Refer to Systems Operation/Testing and Adjusting, "Fuel Quality - Test". Also refer to Truck Application and Installation Guide, LEBT5109. Check the operation of the low-pressure fuel system. Refer to Systems Operation, "Fuel System". Ensure that the fuel system has been primed. Refer to Systems Operation, "Fuel System". Check for a restriction in the fuel supply lines. Check the fuel filters. If the temperature is below 0 °C (32 °F), check for solidified fuel (wax). Unit Injectors Perform the "Injector Solenoid Test" on Cat ET in order to determine if all of the injector solenoids are being energized by the ECM. Perform the "Cylinder Cutout Test" on Cat ET in order to check the performance of each cylinder. Refer to the Troubleshooting, Injector Solenoid Circuit - Test. Verify that the injection system is delivering the correct pressure. Refer to the Troubleshooting, Injection Actuation Pressure - Test. Note: Refer to Special Instruction, REHS3819, Procedure for Troubleshooting and Cleaning the Oil Rail System for the Hydraulic Electronic Unit Injector. Verify that the repair eliminates the problem. Combustion Problem Check for mechanical problems that may affect combustion of the fuel. Cold Weather and Problems with the Starting Aids The engine may have an air inlet heater and a starting aid (ether) may also be utilized. If the "Starting Aid Output" is programmed to "Automatic" and conditions are correct, the ECM will enable the output for a maximum of 30 seconds. The air inlet heater will not turn on until 5 seconds after completion of the ether injection. If there is a problem with the ether injection system, excessive cranking and/or failure to start could result. For example, if the ether canister is empty, the ECM might activate the starting aid output for 30 seconds. Another 5 seconds would elapse before the air inlet heater is turned on. Make sure that the starting aid system is OK. For engines that do not use the starting aid output, the air inlet heater is designed to help with starting in cold weather. Make sure that the circuit for the air inlet heater is OK.
  4. I have been finding used Cub 2000 series and fixing them up for my neighbors. They built them with the steel hoods up to around 2005. You can usually get one between $500 and $1500. I strip them to the chassis, clean everything up and toss in a few new bushings, change the fluids and filters, repack the spindle bearings, and put back together with new belts and pulleys, usually less than $500 in parts and an afternoon of labor. IMO, the 2000 series was the last good Cub. All my neighbors love theirs, even though they're 15 to 20 yrs old. Surprisingly though, some of the higher end box store tractors really aren't that bad these days. As mentioned before, maintenance is the key. I know several people with 20 yr old Craftsmans that cut the grass just fine.
  5. Guess if I nuke work I can't use anything more than a few KT unless I go on vacation or move farther away. Just noticed, if you go down on the bottom right and click version 2.0 you can get estimated casualties too, makes it much better😆
  6. Sounds like it's probably an electrical issue, and first thing I tell people is check your grounds. Next, have you or anyone had a scan tool on it? Most likely, some sensor is giving a false reading, or the wiring is messed up between the sensor and PCM. It won't necessarily throw a check engine light - fault code, or could be like my one vehicle where the light burnt out. The biggest mistake people make on EFI engines is throwing parts at it without hooking up a scanner. There's 4 or 5 sensors that could make it dump gas like crazy or not at all, even before the PCM goes into closed loop operation. A poor connection or broken wire can give a false reading just as easily as the sensor being failed. You need to see what each signal going to the controller is telling it.
  7. I haven't heard how bad compaction is but won't say it can't be bad. Dualed up with all the weights hanging on it it runs 52,000 lbs. As to using the power, sure at a slow speed and upping the implement size would stop it, but the idea is to pull smaller stuff faster. According to one of our field techs who went out to a customer demo, they pulled a heavy 36 foot disk at 10 mph without issue. I'm thinking these first 10xx's are being built in the Fendt plant overseas with intent to bring at least part of the production/assembly to MN at a later date. As to being ugly, sure it isn't as sexy as a 5488. But I never considered farming to be a fashion show. How long will it last.... maybe not 50 yrs like tractors of old, but ask how many acres will it cover in its lifespan and things look a little different. Love it or hate it, not my bobber. Once I figured out how to make it go, it was neat to drive. Similar experience to being there 50 yrs ago and seeing the first 1206 show up on the lot..... nobody will ever need a tractor that big....
  8. Lots cheaper than an actual horse.
  9. From what I could find on the web (they haven't told any of us shop guys what the damages would be) MSRP for a base 1050 is north of $400k
  10. We got the first Challenger/Fendt 1050 in the yard today. Just took the 520 HP monster for a first drive, I want one.
  11. I wouldn't say they are the high quality grill that is going to last a lifetime, but the CharBroil "infrared" gas grills are superb. Being they use a closed grate rather than open, you don't get so many flare ups, and the closed grate minimizes air flow so you don't dry out your meat as much. They do take a little getting used to cooking on, but once I figured it out I much prefer the flavor and finish over an open grate gas grill. Going on 3rd yr with mine and everything is still looking like new. That said, I also have a Weber kettle and an upright propane/charcoal smoker. Nothing beats a long slow cook done in natural wood smoke. Next thing to check out is sous vide cooking, this is where you cook meats in a vacuum sealed bag, then reverse sear afterwards. Check it out on YouTube, I've pretty much switched over to this style cooking for most meats. Pretty cool being able to break down a tough cheap steak cooking it at 130f for 3 hours and not dry it out.
  12. Problem is we're not going to be there to pay for it all now.... It's like the spoiled kid who has been off to college with daddy's credit card, standing at the counter with a cart full of booze, staring at the clerk who just told him his magic card has been declined.....
  13. There's Ziegler Cat, with a branch right off the freeway at the St Augusta exit. I personally garuanty you will get first class service support every evening there with a Cat machine. As to what to buy.... $5000 is most likely going to be buying someone's headache. Skid steers are a hot commodity in central MN. If you want the best $10k skidsteer, find a clean Case 1845C. Keep in mind it's not a high performance machine, but they are pretty much indestructible. Only problem is they quit building them 20+ yrs ago. The XT series that replaced them weren't bad but not nearly as good IMO. There are plenty of Bobcats around that price range, but I'm not a big fan of them. 15-25k we can get your dad into a decent older Cat wheeled machine, there may even be something sitting on the lot in STC. Same money will get a small frame track machine that needs some tlc. Tell your dad to stop by the Ziegler stc shop mid evening some night and I'll be happy to give a good run down of what the high and low points of various machines are. Steve
  14. How big of a job is it to unhook that shaft? Get it out of there and fire it up, at least you'll know whether the vib is in front of or behind the shaft.