Willie B

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Everything posted by Willie B

  1. Value of TD15B

    An acquaintance has a TD15B about 1974. Clock reads 2000 hours, I'd be very surprised if it's accurate. Undercarriage is very nice. It was originally outfitted as a cable plow unit. The front blade mounts were used with a giant phone cable reel. Fairleads were arranged over the roof for the phone cable, and a huge BRON cable plow is mounted on the rear. He has removed the reel holder, and fitted it with a U blade. It has street pads added to the grouser shoes, which appear to be perfect. The BRON cable plow I consider obsolete, everything town to town now is fiber optic. Fiber won't tolerate being plowed in, it gets damaged. it's too big, and ungainly to serve as a ripper. Beside that, there aren't enough valves to do everything. He has very little money in it, I don't absolutely need it, but it is very cool. I'm considering owning it a couple years, then reselling. What is it worth? What should I offer? Willie
  2. Value of TD15B

    I should take pictures. It is huge, hangs out 10' behind the tractor. You can swing, raise, and change angle both front to back, and left to right. The plow itself is 3' tall. Cable runs down through the plow, and plays out the bottom rear. I believe this one also vibrated. Dennis Smith of LMS Construction laid thousands of miles of armored multi pair phone cable with its twin. I believe few cable varieties would tolerate the beating this machine gives it. It buries about three feet max, so water pipe would freeze in VT. It'd have to be quite flexible, but crush proof. These days, all the new fiber optic cable is put in conduit after directional boring. The glass doesn't go in until later. Willie
  3. TD7G tracks

    Since I bought it I've had issues with tracks rubbing the blade angle cylinders. I struggled with correcting minor wear in the c arm pins mid way under the tractor. Wear wasn't severe, but every little bit helps. Then I noticed some wear in the slides that locate the front idlers, and reworked all of them. Still there was a problem. Last winter a keeper bolt holding the C arm pin on one side must have got knocked off, allowing the C arm to swing an inch sideways. The tracks swallowed a blade angle cylinder. Replacement was a real adventure. We painted the whole tractor this summer. Paint is already gone from the cylinders again. I've learned that shoes are 1" wider than standard. The Sorfa chains have a tunnel 9/10 of an inch wider than the ridge on the front idler. I don't know if this is normal, or a mismatch. Today, I cut the inboard side of the shoes 3/4". Now, at rest I have a comfortable 1-1/2" clearance between track shoes, and angle cylinders. I hope I'm done. Willie
  4. TD7G tracks

    Dresser offered standard track 15", with five bottom rollers, 17" offset track, 7.5" inboard of the center of the chain, 9.5" outboard of the chain center. They offered a 24" wide track version with wider crossmembers, and offset sprockets. I believe they offered a six roller long track. Chain spacing is standard 5 roller. It is a narrow machine. 5' 9" overall width.
  5. TD7G tracks

    This tractor is a bit of a mystery. It reads 3400 HRS. Chains are aftermarket, shoes are worn quite a lot, and too big for the application. Everything else looks to be original. A fellow who would know, told me the diamond plate on the floorboard is a good indicator of hours. If the bumps are still there under the operator's heel, it isn't a high hour machine. It had some wear in the tilt faces on the blade, but otherwise, seemed to agree with the hour meter which is the variety it left the Korean factory with. Yes, I'm ashamed to admit, this is the 16th of this model to be bolted together in Korea. All bolts are SAE, so it's before they went oriental all the way. Why you would replace shoes with the wrong size before 3400 hours is a mystery. Did somebody think it'd be good to refit with second hand shoes? To my eye the shoes have a lot of hours on them, the chain, not so much.
  6. Pictures of new paint TD7G

    My first project with heavy steel, and Dual Shield welding.It has been pretty welds on lighter stuff. I had a few blunders to hide, and significant distortion to correct to make bolt holes line up. Note the temporary spreader bar. I used a 20 ton hydraulic jack to spread, so bolts would line up.It's a log arch to lift butts over stumps, and rocks, instead of hanging up. Also it gets the choker further away from the tracks in tight turns. Maybe a winch in the future.Willie
  7. My TD7G. I know, it isn't really an IH. Dresser repowered them with a Cummins, and changed the model to G. My son insisted on the new paint. Still waiting for decals. I thought it might not be as clean by the time they arrive. Willie
  8. TD7C dozer mounting clamp missing

    I don't have a C. I do have a G. I'm not absolutely clear what is missing, but I do know where I'd turn for answers. Reggie Lissier at Winmill In Rutland Vt can answer your questions, get you parts, and put it together if needed. From memory he answers part number questions. Often as not, on the shelf is the needed part. If parts are "stupid expensive" he tells me how to fabricate.
  9. The Power of Tracks

    Didn't even sound like it was working all that hard.
  10. Tractor pulls

    We held our fourth? annual tractor pull yesterday. FBO our local volunteer fire company. The town of 1200 people in south western VT (Danby) 50 years ago boasted 70 dairy farms shipping milk. Now the count is 3. Nonetheless, most of the old tractors are still around. As we once had the IH dealer there were plenty of IH tractors. Yesterday, the IH tractors were very well represented. I'll opine that default was the explanation, but my good friend Tractor Dan P was the final winner with his Farmall 560 (1959) . One big Oliver piloted by someone unfamiliar with it, couldn't be shifted into low range. Another big Oliver wasn't brought to the pull, as its owner had just undergone hip replacement surgery with major complications. A Case 500 usually a major contender wasn't there either, its owner ain't sayin' why. Nonetheless, a gorgeous Farmall 460 Piloted, and owned by Jesse Aiken of Claremont (or close by) NH made a noble show, but tonnage mattered at the end of the day. He pulled more than several a ton heavier. Everybody turns out. Some like chicken barbecued, others love tractors, others favor beautiful color in one of the most beautiful spots on the planet. Mr. Pearce with one wing in a sling had been discharged from hospital a day earlier, had been threatened with murder if he mounted a tractor, so he waited 'till the missus left to board the 560. There was room on the boat for a few more blocks, but he still did at least as well as the JD 830 he battled until the end. If you can, come see us next Columbus Day weekend, a good time is assured. Willie
  11. Tractor pulls

    Part of the Sunday dinner crowd at our table: Mary, (future daughter in law) foreground, Morgan, (blonde) Kate, Zach, (Morgan's brother, Kate's fiance) Zack, (Kate's brother). My son's work drone, he's a licensed commercial drone pilot. Liz Capen on Seth's M with my M in the background Me, on Jessie Aiken's 460, I wish it was mine. Willie
  12. Tractor pulls

    Andy,(one of the extra sons) and his fiance, Amanda on my B275, Zack, (My younger son) on his brother's M, Jessie Aiken on his 460, Tractor Dan P in the last pull of the day. No he didn't pull all 24 800 LB blocks on 1200LB boat. Tractor Dan P in his custom made t shirt. Two water heads I raised trying to stop Liz Capen with Seth's M.
  13. Tractor pulls

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  14. I have the TD7G , my manuals also cover 100E, so I believe the dozer, VS the loader, and the change to Cummins engine are the biggest differences. These beasts have fair pushing power uphill in low. Other gears are for getting to the push. There is considerable slip in the torque converter. I've never had one without, I've heard is is very different. I'll illustrate with the backhoe I have with the same 3.9 litre Cummins engine. Driving into a gravel bank with a gear tractor I tend to dig holes with the tires. With torque converter I can feed just enough power to the wheels to move forward. No holes are dug. Next scoop is not more difficult.
  15. Tractor pulls

    I have a military spec cell phone I've had about 15 years. I don't take pictures. Tractor Dan P has the same phone, but takes pictures all the time. How many good ones he got, I don't know. He had been operated on a few days earlier for an infected bursa in his elbow. I think he was a little off his game. I'll ask around. Maybe somebody has electronic pictures. Willie
  16. Tractor pulls

    We held our fourth? annual tractor pull yesterday. FBO our local volunteer fire company. The town of 1200 people in south western VT (Danby) 50 years ago boasted 70 dairy farms shipping milk. Now the count is 3. Nonetheless, most of the old tractors are still around. As we once had the IH dealer there were plenty of IH tractors. Yesterday, the IH tractors were very well represented. I'll opine that default was the explanation, but my good friend Tractor Dan P was the final winner with his Farmall 560 (1959) . One big Oliver piloted by someone unfamiliar with it, couldn't be shifted into low range. Another big Oliver wasn't brought to the pull, as its owner had just undergone hip replacement surgery with major complications. A Case 500 usually a major contender wasn't there either, its owner ain't sayin' why. Nonetheless, a gorgeous Farmall 460 Piloted, and owned by Jesse Aiken of Claremont (or close by) NH made a noble show, but tonnage mattered at the end of the day. He pulled more than several a ton heavier. Everybody turns out. Some like chicken barbecued, others love tractors, others favor beautiful color in one of the most beautiful spots on the planet. Mr. Pearce with one wing in a sling had been discharged from hospital a day earlier, had been threatened with murder if he mounted a tractor, so he waited 'till the missus left to board the 560. There was room on the boat for a few more blocks, but he still did at least as well as the JD 830 he battled until the end. If you can, come see us next Columbus Day weekend, a good time is assured. Willie
  17. Don't ask me how I know. Your ROPS won't necessarily protect you from a tree that breaks, and comes your way. I now raise the blade, and tip them over first. I had half a 30" pine tree land within a few inches of my lap when I didn't even have the ROPS installed. Healthy trees are far more predictable than dead ones, still they can kill you.
  18. Finney is another good source for parts. If you need parts or knowledge, call Reggie Lussier at Winmill Equipment in Rutland VT. That man has forgotten nothing he ever knew about IH machines, and he knows all the details! Not a better parts man, or mechanic alive. Willie
  19. I was born in 1956. At the time of my birth my father, and mother worked for the local IH farm dealer. Father had a falling out with the owner, and boycotted the place. Mother kept the books 27 years. I was obsessed with the tractors, wanted them all! Most of the crawlers sold to farmers were 340's The 500's were those who had a need for a real crawler. No, I've never owned a 500. I now have a TD7G, sort of a distant cousin, by a different father. I sure wouldn't refuse a 500 even 50 years later. Willie
  20. Pictures of new paint TD7G

    Just a few finishing touches left to do. Seth did pretty good! Sorry guys, it isn't technically IH, A year earlier, it'd have been.
  21. Frame rail to bolster bolts, Farmall M

    I believe this is a great idea. Be aware that some welders may not survive this practice. Most welders have a thermal overload built into the circuitry. Big, or older, or most bigger modern welders US built will handle it. I'd avoid the practice if all you have is a Chinese machine. Any welder I ever owned will ignite the rod up to 1/8" and it'll burn off like a light bulb with broken glass. Willie In an earlier day I thawed frozen underground water pipes with a Twentieth Century 295 Amp AC welder Circa 1974 with 100% duty cycle. The high resistance of galvanized steel water pipe limited current in the welder. It worked very well. In 1995 the Municipal water system, (200 customers) was rebuilt. Now it's plastic main line, copper branches across the road, and galvanized across lawns, to houses. Electricity doesn't even warm the K copper, but melts the couplings where the low bid contractor attached copper to galv.
  22. Frame rail to bolster bolts, Farmall M

    Wait a minute! Is that a small Atlas Lathe? How's next weekend sound? Willie
  23. Frame rail to bolster bolts, Farmall M

    VT Fireman; I am your father. Heat the bolt heads, Heat them repeatedly. As they cool, use penetrant. If the heads snap off, likely they will, Offer a big washer, and weld through it. As it comes flush, weld on a big nut. Allow to cool each round before trying to use a wrench. It might take several rounds of this. There have been maintenance rods available specifically for this application. The claim is that the flux protects the female thread. Willie
  24. Making Loose Hay

    My father (born 1922) was a farm kid. I was destined to be a farm kid, but the Japanese changed history for lots of us. By the time I was a teenager maybe 1968, or 1969 we lived on 1/2 acre backed up to Green Mountain National forest. There was plenty of unused hay land. My older sister had to have a horse. We put up loose hay using the equipment from the farm. It was mowed with a scythe, bundled, loaded, and stacked with a hay fork. The shape of the stack simulated a thatched roof. My father's skill with a hay fork leaves me astounded to this day. He would heap hay until he was able to stab the center of a pile and lift maybe 50 lbs on a fork. We had no hay wagon, only a small trailer. Four of these forkfuls of hay were arranged on the corners of the trailer deck, a fifth was placed in center to bind. Next layer was six, then two in center. Ultimately, a Farmall Cub, or a Jeep hauled a seven foot wide trailer loaded with 12 feet in width, 7 feet in height. It was unloaded in reverse order forming a stack of ten forkfuls in a circle. Layer upon layer built it to 15 feet in height. A big tarp covered the top. For one horse, grain supplemented a hay diet. Willie
  25. 48 years ago....

    I was around then. There was scuttlebutt at the time that the "Moon" pictures were taken on Earth. I've never doubted the reality of the landing, but I find it hilarious that somebody forgot the film. I imagine the conversation through the bubbles: "I can't believe you forgot the film!" "I didn't forget the film! You did!" "It wasn't my job to remember the film!" Truth is the film was on the roof of the rocket when Aldrin was buckling Armstrong into his rear facing car seat.