Willie B

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About Willie B

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 09/13/1956

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Mount Tabor VT
  • Interests
    Too many to do justice to any. All involve working with my hands.

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466 profile views
  1. Value of TD15B

    I should take pictures. It is huge, hangs out 10' behind the tractor. You can swing, raise, and change angle both front to back, and left to right. The plow itself is 3' tall. Cable runs down through the plow, and plays out the bottom rear. I believe this one also vibrated. Dennis Smith of LMS Construction laid thousands of miles of armored multi pair phone cable with its twin. I believe few cable varieties would tolerate the beating this machine gives it. It buries about three feet max, so water pipe would freeze in VT. It'd have to be quite flexible, but crush proof. These days, all the new fiber optic cable is put in conduit after directional boring. The glass doesn't go in until later. Willie
  2. Value of TD15B

    An acquaintance has a TD15B about 1974. Clock reads 2000 hours, I'd be very surprised if it's accurate. Undercarriage is very nice. It was originally outfitted as a cable plow unit. The front blade mounts were used with a giant phone cable reel. Fairleads were arranged over the roof for the phone cable, and a huge BRON cable plow is mounted on the rear. He has removed the reel holder, and fitted it with a U blade. It has street pads added to the grouser shoes, which appear to be perfect. The BRON cable plow I consider obsolete, everything town to town now is fiber optic. Fiber won't tolerate being plowed in, it gets damaged. it's too big, and ungainly to serve as a ripper. Beside that, there aren't enough valves to do everything. He has very little money in it, I don't absolutely need it, but it is very cool. I'm considering owning it a couple years, then reselling. What is it worth? What should I offer? Willie
  3. TD7G tracks

    Dresser offered standard track 15", with five bottom rollers, 17" offset track, 7.5" inboard of the center of the chain, 9.5" outboard of the chain center. They offered a 24" wide track version with wider crossmembers, and offset sprockets. I believe they offered a six roller long track. Chain spacing is standard 5 roller. It is a narrow machine. 5' 9" overall width.
  4. TD7G tracks

    This tractor is a bit of a mystery. It reads 3400 HRS. Chains are aftermarket, shoes are worn quite a lot, and too big for the application. Everything else looks to be original. A fellow who would know, told me the diamond plate on the floorboard is a good indicator of hours. If the bumps are still there under the operator's heel, it isn't a high hour machine. It had some wear in the tilt faces on the blade, but otherwise, seemed to agree with the hour meter which is the variety it left the Korean factory with. Yes, I'm ashamed to admit, this is the 16th of this model to be bolted together in Korea. All bolts are SAE, so it's before they went oriental all the way. Why you would replace shoes with the wrong size before 3400 hours is a mystery. Did somebody think it'd be good to refit with second hand shoes? To my eye the shoes have a lot of hours on them, the chain, not so much.
  5. TD7G tracks

    Since I bought it I've had issues with tracks rubbing the blade angle cylinders. I struggled with correcting minor wear in the c arm pins mid way under the tractor. Wear wasn't severe, but every little bit helps. Then I noticed some wear in the slides that locate the front idlers, and reworked all of them. Still there was a problem. Last winter a keeper bolt holding the C arm pin on one side must have got knocked off, allowing the C arm to swing an inch sideways. The tracks swallowed a blade angle cylinder. Replacement was a real adventure. We painted the whole tractor this summer. Paint is already gone from the cylinders again. I've learned that shoes are 1" wider than standard. The Sorfa chains have a tunnel 9/10 of an inch wider than the ridge on the front idler. I don't know if this is normal, or a mismatch. Today, I cut the inboard side of the shoes 3/4". Now, at rest I have a comfortable 1-1/2" clearance between track shoes, and angle cylinders. I hope I'm done. Willie
  6. Pictures of new paint TD7G

    My first project with heavy steel, and Dual Shield welding.It has been pretty welds on lighter stuff. I had a few blunders to hide, and significant distortion to correct to make bolt holes line up. Note the temporary spreader bar. I used a 20 ton hydraulic jack to spread, so bolts would line up.It's a log arch to lift butts over stumps, and rocks, instead of hanging up. Also it gets the choker further away from the tracks in tight turns. Maybe a winch in the future.Willie
  7. TD7C dozer mounting clamp missing

    I don't have a C. I do have a G. I'm not absolutely clear what is missing, but I do know where I'd turn for answers. Reggie Lissier at Winmill In Rutland Vt can answer your questions, get you parts, and put it together if needed. From memory he answers part number questions. Often as not, on the shelf is the needed part. If parts are "stupid expensive" he tells me how to fabricate.
  8. The Power of Tracks

    Didn't even sound like it was working all that hard.
  9. Tractor pulls

    Part of the Sunday dinner crowd at our table: Mary, (future daughter in law) foreground, Morgan, (blonde) Kate, Zach, (Morgan's brother, Kate's fiance) Zack, (Kate's brother). My son's work drone, he's a licensed commercial drone pilot. Liz Capen on Seth's M with my M in the background Me, on Jessie Aiken's 460, I wish it was mine. Willie
  10. Tractor pulls

    Andy,(one of the extra sons) and his fiance, Amanda on my B275, Zack, (My younger son) on his brother's M, Jessie Aiken on his 460, Tractor Dan P in the last pull of the day. No he didn't pull all 24 800 LB blocks on 1200LB boat. Tractor Dan P in his custom made t shirt. Two water heads I raised trying to stop Liz Capen with Seth's M.
  11. Tractor pulls

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  12. I have the TD7G , my manuals also cover 100E, so I believe the dozer, VS the loader, and the change to Cummins engine are the biggest differences. These beasts have fair pushing power uphill in low. Other gears are for getting to the push. There is considerable slip in the torque converter. I've never had one without, I've heard is is very different. I'll illustrate with the backhoe I have with the same 3.9 litre Cummins engine. Driving into a gravel bank with a gear tractor I tend to dig holes with the tires. With torque converter I can feed just enough power to the wheels to move forward. No holes are dug. Next scoop is not more difficult.
  13. Tractor pulls

    I have a military spec cell phone I've had about 15 years. I don't take pictures. Tractor Dan P has the same phone, but takes pictures all the time. How many good ones he got, I don't know. He had been operated on a few days earlier for an infected bursa in his elbow. I think he was a little off his game. I'll ask around. Maybe somebody has electronic pictures. Willie
  14. Tractor pulls

    We held our fourth? annual tractor pull yesterday. FBO our local volunteer fire company. The town of 1200 people in south western VT (Danby) 50 years ago boasted 70 dairy farms shipping milk. Now the count is 3. Nonetheless, most of the old tractors are still around. As we once had the IH dealer there were plenty of IH tractors. Yesterday, the IH tractors were very well represented. I'll opine that default was the explanation, but my good friend Tractor Dan P was the final winner with his Farmall 560 (1959) . One big Oliver piloted by someone unfamiliar with it, couldn't be shifted into low range. Another big Oliver wasn't brought to the pull, as its owner had just undergone hip replacement surgery with major complications. A Case 500 usually a major contender wasn't there either, its owner ain't sayin' why. Nonetheless, a gorgeous Farmall 460 Piloted, and owned by Jesse Aiken of Claremont (or close by) NH made a noble show, but tonnage mattered at the end of the day. He pulled more than several a ton heavier. Everybody turns out. Some like chicken barbecued, others love tractors, others favor beautiful color in one of the most beautiful spots on the planet. Mr. Pearce with one wing in a sling had been discharged from hospital a day earlier, had been threatened with murder if he mounted a tractor, so he waited 'till the missus left to board the 560. There was room on the boat for a few more blocks, but he still did at least as well as the JD 830 he battled until the end. If you can, come see us next Columbus Day weekend, a good time is assured. Willie
  15. Tractor pulls

    We held our fourth? annual tractor pull yesterday. FBO our local volunteer fire company. The town of 1200 people in south western VT (Danby) 50 years ago boasted 70 dairy farms shipping milk. Now the count is 3. Nonetheless, most of the old tractors are still around. As we once had the IH dealer there were plenty of IH tractors. Yesterday, the IH tractors were very well represented. I'll opine that default was the explanation, but my good friend Tractor Dan P was the final winner with his Farmall 560 (1959) . One big Oliver piloted by someone unfamiliar with it, couldn't be shifted into low range. Another big Oliver wasn't brought to the pull, as its owner had just undergone hip replacement surgery with major complications. A Case 500 usually a major contender wasn't there either, its owner ain't sayin' why. Nonetheless, a gorgeous Farmall 460 Piloted, and owned by Jesse Aiken of Claremont (or close by) NH made a noble show, but tonnage mattered at the end of the day. He pulled more than several a ton heavier. Everybody turns out. Some like chicken barbecued, others love tractors, others favor beautiful color in one of the most beautiful spots on the planet. Mr. Pearce with one wing in a sling had been discharged from hospital a day earlier, had been threatened with murder if he mounted a tractor, so he waited 'till the missus left to board the 560. There was room on the boat for a few more blocks, but he still did at least as well as the JD 830 he battled until the end. If you can, come see us next Columbus Day weekend, a good time is assured. Willie