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I have an Irrigation question


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#21 Ron K

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 09:59 PM





Olson in Atkinson, NE. They just galvinize now.



I forgot them. I was just there a few weeks ago.
I think there was another company at Aurora Ne also.
Sheepdog have you ever used a Kroy Air system?
We had one when I was a Kid and I think I spent Half my childhood working on it


My brother works for Olsons. There are actually 2 different Olson Pivots. The galv plant makes like 3 a year...basicly none. The other is basicly a genaric Valley. My neighbor put one up bout 4 years ago. Seams to be alright. Put up 4 new Valleys a couple years ago. They were 16 miles form home and I think he just felt more comfortable about using them that far away.

Rain Cat is one that I know of that wasn't made in NE. Of course out of business. Lots of them are defunct. I use to haul concrete and seen lots of weird used pivots moved in and out. Pierce just came to me as well.

Proably the strangest one was called the Dowd Walker. Built on the principals of the Valley water drive, except instead of wheels it had "feet" basically. Never seen one move, some how the one leg would come up and move ahead and the next one would come from behind. Again not very popular. Konizian as well.

The first Olsons were also hydrolic.




I have seen the Dowd Walker ones I just didn't know who made them.
I worked in the Bartlett area some back in the 1970's and 1980's Help put up a lot of pivots and took a lot of pivots down.
Worked on the old Foxley feed lot when It was started. That was about the joke I was ever around.


I put hay up on the back side of Foxleys...Herd Co now. One of a kind place thats for sure! Leo Dowd made them. He had a gas station in Columbus. Then in the 50's well say he bought some old army trucks and got into the gravel business. Also oil wells. His wife was from Chambers and he bought a bunch of land around O'Neill and developed it in the late 60's during the big boom up here. Between that and oil he got pretty well off. He was quite the inventor and always thought outside the box. He bought some land in Barstow Cal...where ever that is (dry area I think) and put down a well. Took a pivot out there and tired to raise small grains on cheap soil. Too poor of dirt so he pulled the well, hired some locals to disassemble the pivot and hauled it back to his brothers in law and developed a pivot for them back here in Chambers just a mile north of me! Didn't make since to me to haul it all back here, but guess hes the millionaire and not me.

I try to think of some of the other off breads of pivots....during the boom lots of people made them.

I'm sure you got some good stories bout Foxleys. Ive seen google pics of the place. 1/2 mile cattle sheds A through N. Pivot endguns above blowouts. People from Ill and Indy would shake there heads bout us loons out here, HAHA


Foxley Cattle was an interesting place. It has been three years since I been to Foxley/Herd cattle. Bill was a good guy to me, he always treated me great. Even when he was in trouble he would take care of me. I first meet him at his Mead Lot. I did some work down there. That is how I got the work at Bartlet. I can not think of the name of the guy that ran the lot at Bartlet??? He was at the Mead lot until the Bartlet lot was built. At Bartlet I dug pits, build sheds. If I remember there was 15 sheds. Worked some on the feed, Steam/grind shed and move the dirt for the silage pit. When It was built it was a state of art feed lot. Steaming corn/feed was unheard of at the time. I think it was the largest confined feedlot in the US at the time it was built. It was the First Eco Friendly feed lot in the States. That is how he got to build it. There was many lawsuits filed over that feed lot. Many people did not want it built. Not only people in the area but people from all over the United States. There was a couple demonstrations over building that lot. There was a hippie that camped out just over the ridge to the north east, I don't know what happened to him. I was there the day the first floor collapses, what a mess. I was leveling land just west of the north main entrance gate, when the floor collapsed. They wanted me to doze a ramp into the pit, so they could get cattle out. They lost a lot of cattle that day. Since then they added the new scale house. I tried to find my pictures of Foxley Cattle. One day they were receiving cattle and trucks were lined up north to were the road turns back east to the highway. That a long ways. They used 4WD Case tractors to pack silage and the tractors looked like ants on the pile. Later I put up pivots, what was funny I removed a lot of the same pivots from the area and tried to reseed grass back in the later 80's. The government payed to tear the grass up and put pivots on it, then the Government payed to tear down the pivots and reseed it. Then when the grass did not grow they payed to put pivots back on the ground until the grass was growing, Then remove then???? There was a D8 14A Cat buried east of Foxley Cattle. It was next to a blowout being repaired and the wind came up and covered the machine up. It was dug out several years later for junk. Many contractors went to the area to make a fast buck. They did not know any thing about the soil and the sand/blow outs/wetlands would just eat them alive. Cat Dozer or Cat's with pull scrapers worked the best to level the "hills" and fill the blow out and wet areas. I had a D8 dozer with a pull scraper and a New D6 at the time. Several companies were tearing down pivots for Banks and they just ruined them. Pivot Companies made a lot of money off the "BOOM". Farmers were mad at the Cattlemen, Cattlemen were mad at Farmers for tearing up grass land. Everyone was mad at the Banks, Farm Credit and FHA. Seen many times neighbors were mad at each other. The 80's were interesting times.
Until you have seen the area it is hard to discribe it. Not everone is cut out to live there It is an area that has to grow on you, The people and land are great.
I love the area and almost bought a ranch there a few years ago. Now I wish I had.
NOTHING MORE BEAUTIFULLY THAN COWS AND CALVES IN THE SAND HILLS.


#22 Ron K

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 10:50 PM

Excavator in blow out by Ainswort Ne.
About 10 years ago Alters Scrap Yard in Council Bluffs called me and want me to haul their Excavator from Jones Salvage by Ainsworth Nebraska to Norfolk to get fixed. What they failed to tell me was the engine was locked up and a track was off. They took the belly pan off to fix some thing and didn't put it back on. A piece of scrap punched a hole in the oil pan and locked the engine up. They took the oil pan off and polished the crank with emery paper, put a new bearing in and ran it a few minutes. It started to knock so they tried to load it and it slid off their trailer. That is how the track came off. As it came off the trailer the motor locked up. It was half on the trailer and mostly off. They removed the oil pan and the crank was shot. They could not move it so the tried to remove the track motors??? instead of the planetary shaft. Now they have a machine with a oil pan off, track motors half off with a track off seating in a blow out full of water, with sand blowing in the motor and Hydr. system. I get there and find this all out.If I would have been smart I would have went home. I found a contractor with an older D6 and he "tried to pull it. I removed the planetary shafts and he could all most move it. I got the track back on and it helped some. I had the folding neck trailer so I jack knifed it in front of the excavator. Between the dozer and truck we got it loaded. Many hours later tired, soaked head to toe it was loaded. I headed down the road, but the mail man decided he wanted the WHOLE ROAD. Off in the ditch I went, I thought the truck, trailer, excavator was going over. Luckily the dozer pulled it right out. Unloading it was worse.

#23 Idaho2+2

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 12:03 AM

What are the taxes? Per acre or per gallon? On an average year how many acre/feet of water are you alloted?

Sorry for all the questions. We're all underground water here. I'm 20-30 miles from the Mississippi river and that replenishes our table so water is good here. 1800 gpm on a well is average with the average depth around 120-140 feet deep.


I can't remember the exact rate on the taxes. They measure the water in "inches" cubic inches I suppose. around here water rights mainly consist of 1 "inch" per acre of land. So on the home forty I have 40" of water rights. And last year the taxes were around $950 give or take. Only thing is I don't get to water with all 40". If we have a good water year they let us have 3/4" per acre because for some reason they have to have a certain amount to spill at the end I guess. So on a good year the home 40 only gets watered with 30". If it is a mediocre water year we may only get 5/8". And when it is dry and crappy we get cut back to a 1/2". I don't know if any of you run gated pipe down corrugates much where you are but on the 40 acres place, everything is furrow irrigated out of gated pipe down the corrugate. If I don't have hardly any leaks in my pipe and things are as they should be on a good year set at 3/4" so 30" of water total, I can set 25+- gates open so 40 acres gets watered roughly 25 corrugates at a time :mellow: . And we won't even talk about if I get cut back to 20 inches lol. It's a challenge for sure.

#24 Art From DeLeon

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 07:32 AM


What are the taxes? Per acre or per gallon? On an average year how many acre/feet of water are you alloted?

Sorry for all the questions. We're all underground water here. I'm 20-30 miles from the Mississippi river and that replenishes our table so water is good here. 1800 gpm on a well is average with the average depth around 120-140 feet deep.


I can't remember the exact rate on the taxes. They measure the water in "inches" cubic inches I suppose. around here water rights mainly consist of 1 "inch" per acre of land. So on the home forty I have 40" of water rights. And last year the taxes were around $950 give or take. Only thing is I don't get to water with all 40". If we have a good water year they let us have 3/4" per acre because for some reason they have to have a certain amount to spill at the end I guess. So on a good year the home 40 only gets watered with 30". If it is a mediocre water year we may only get 5/8". And when it is dry and crappy we get cut back to a 1/2". I don't know if any of you run gated pipe down corrugates much where you are but on the 40 acres place, everything is furrow irrigated out of gated pipe down the corrugate. If I don't have hardly any leaks in my pipe and things are as they should be on a good year set at 3/4" so 30" of water total, I can set 25+- gates open so 40 acres gets watered roughly 25 corrugates at a time Posted Image . And we won't even talk about if I get cut back to 20 inches lol. It's a challenge for sure.



In the Lower Rio Grande Valley, the irrigation water, at least in the water district that supplied the water for my parent's grapefruit orchard was measured in HOURS. The allotment was for such and such number of hours of water, and if you wanted more, you had to purchase it from someone who wasn't going to use his. It was all flood irrigation, with the water taken out of the Rio Grande. In fact, I do not ever remember seeing either center pivots, or pipe for irrigation, for vegetables, they would use V-ditches and siphon hoses.
The Edinburg Canal was the North boundary on their place, but their water came across the canal in a little flume, from the water district's pumping station about 2 miles NW of their place. The yards on the older homes all had outlets off the underground water lines to flood the yard. The water from the river has so much salt in it, that the grass takes on a yellow tinge, and after a rain that pushes the salt further down out of the root zone, the grass will become bright green.

Foxley Feeders has been around for a long, long time. I remember their first yard was just west of Venice, NE., before the big yard was built south of Meade, near the old ammunition plant. The last time I went past where the old yard was it was being developed with houses, all with a view of the Platte.

Tearing up the Sandhills for agriculture made about as much sense as when Gates Rubber came into Eastern Colorado and plowed up all that rangeland, used up most of the water, went out of business, and left the country.

I wish I could remember the name of the feedyard just outside of Broken Bow, on the road south, towards Oconto, it was Adams, IIRC.

#25 farmall57

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 07:37 AM

I still have and use a Hygromatic water drive pivot sprinker system. It was installed in 1966. Is about as crude as you can imagine. It uses a gear box at each tower driven exactly like the tractor sprinkler you water your lawn with. I really don't know much about the company, but I think they were in Colorado Springs, CO?

Art, I live in the area Gates Rubber did their thing. If you want some interesting conversation just mention Gates at the coffee shop, you'll hear old timers stories for hours about Gates and their project.

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#26 Tim706x2

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 08:09 AM

What was Gates trying to do?

#27 farmall57

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 08:30 AM

I sure don't know a lot of the story, they bought up land and developed pivot irrigation. But they were trying to raise unconventional crops for the area, using fresh out of college kids for management, and it was a huge flop.

3788, 856, 666 w/F11, 240 w/Wagner backhoe, 4136 IH Skid Steer, 3850 Payloader, 350 Diesel utility, 300, M (2), H (2), Super C, 58 A110, 59 B160, 62 C120 4x4, 66 Scout, 68 Scout, 68 Travelall, 71 Loadstar 1600, 75 Loadstar 1700 4x4 w/Coleman axle, 71 1110 4x4, 73 1210 4x4 (3), 74 150 4x4, 74 Scout w/Chrysler 440, 78 Traveler, 80 Scout Diesel, 80 Terra Diesel, , 392 LPG Irrigation Engine, 84 F250 w/6.9 HyperMax Turbo, 2000 F350 PowerStroke, Cadets-60, 111, Cub Cadets-Original, 70, 100, 127, 1450. Literature collection too!


#28 Amo

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 07:35 PM



What are the taxes? Per acre or per gallon? On an average year how many acre/feet of water are you alloted?

Sorry for all the questions. We're all underground water here. I'm 20-30 miles from the Mississippi river and that replenishes our table so water is good here. 1800 gpm on a well is average with the average depth around 120-140 feet deep.


I can't remember the exact rate on the taxes. They measure the water in "inches" cubic inches I suppose. around here water rights mainly consist of 1 "inch" per acre of land. So on the home forty I have 40" of water rights. And last year the taxes were around $950 give or take. Only thing is I don't get to water with all 40". If we have a good water year they let us have 3/4" per acre because for some reason they have to have a certain amount to spill at the end I guess. So on a good year the home 40 only gets watered with 30". If it is a mediocre water year we may only get 5/8". And when it is dry and crappy we get cut back to a 1/2". I don't know if any of you run gated pipe down corrugates much where you are but on the 40 acres place, everything is furrow irrigated out of gated pipe down the corrugate. If I don't have hardly any leaks in my pipe and things are as they should be on a good year set at 3/4" so 30" of water total, I can set 25+- gates open so 40 acres gets watered roughly 25 corrugates at a time Posted Image . And we won't even talk about if I get cut back to 20 inches lol. It's a challenge for sure.



In the Lower Rio Grande Valley, the irrigation water, at least in the water district that supplied the water for my parent's grapefruit orchard was measured in HOURS. The allotment was for such and such number of hours of water, and if you wanted more, you had to purchase it from someone who wasn't going to use his. It was all flood irrigation, with the water taken out of the Rio Grande. In fact, I do not ever remember seeing either center pivots, or pipe for irrigation, for vegetables, they would use V-ditches and siphon hoses.
The Edinburg Canal was the North boundary on their place, but their water came across the canal in a little flume, from the water district's pumping station about 2 miles NW of their place. The yards on the older homes all had outlets off the underground water lines to flood the yard. The water from the river has so much salt in it, that the grass takes on a yellow tinge, and after a rain that pushes the salt further down out of the root zone, the grass will become bright green.

Foxley Feeders has been around for a long, long time. I remember their first yard was just west of Venice, NE., before the big yard was built south of Meade, near the old ammunition plant. The last time I went past where the old yard was it was being developed with houses, all with a view of the Platte.

Tearing up the Sandhills for agriculture made about as much sense as when Gates Rubber came into Eastern Colorado and plowed up all that rangeland, used up most of the water, went out of business, and left the country.

I wish I could remember the name of the feedyard just outside of Broken Bow, on the road south, towards Oconto, it was Adams, IIRC.


Ya Adams Land and Cattle. It was always speculated that I'm Bob Peterson (IBP) accually owned it in a round about way. They also own a smaller one just east of Broken Bow.

The best Foxleys story I've heard was they started chopping silage. Backed the trucks up to the edge of the pit and dumped over. Kept shoving it over the edge or what ever. Nobody realized untill too late an 8630 was along the wall and was well covered and packed with silage before anybody figured it out.

If you put enough manure on it it is amazing what will grow. My neighbor farms ground on the back side of Foxleys. One pivot averaged over 200 bu an acre. This was a dry year when to pot holes got planted on time and didn't drowned out and manure was spread the year before. Then same conditions except no manure didn't do 70 stright through. Stuff rents for roughly $70 an acre
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