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IHC's contribution to the WWII war effort


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#11 ole three bottom

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 04:50 PM

What about other's MM, MF, Deere, Oliver, and so on?



Ernest, As stated in 41M's post the government limited all civilian manufacturing. That limited new automobiles, trucks, tractors, tires, you name it. The government also incouraged all industry to get involved with production of the war machine in the name of victory. Which industry did, that is how they survived. Off hand I can't tell you what all Ford built during the war. Nor can I list what Oliver , MM, Chevrolet, GMC, AC or any one else built or contributed to the war effort. But you can bet that to not join in the war effort would have been considered un American and detramental to the future well being of any large manufacturing company. When America finally entered the war they entered 100%. An there is little doubt but the way Industry was able to switch to military production, and put Rosie the riviter to work while Joe was fighting for freedom on the front line set the course of victory.
Little Wonder, I'm no Little Genius. But I get closer to being a #60 with each passing year.

Grandpa's Surer H, 1944 H, My ole 1066, 710 6-16 Automatic, Little Genius plows, 1 and 2 bottom ,2 bottom Little Wonder,2-#27V mowers, a #25 mower, #7 mower, 240 HM, 2 row cultivators, High wheel McCormick grain drill, S-3 Cream Separator. Collecting ole Red Iron can be expensive, But It sure is fun.

#12 Cotton Farmer

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 06:35 PM

Here's but a few:
Ford; B-24 Liberator 4 engine bombers.
Oliver; Cletrac primemovers.
MM; Aircraft tugs.
Chevrolet; Trucks, staff cars.
GMC; trucks.
AC; Bulldozers.
Studebaker; Trucks.
Chrysler; M4 Sherman tanks.
Cadillac; M5 Stuart tanks.
Massey-Harris: M5 Stuart tanks.
White; M3 Halftracks.
Willys; Jeeps.
Every things coming up roses, but I planted cotton.

#13 ole three bottom

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:01 PM

Thanks Cotton Farmer ;)
Little Wonder, I'm no Little Genius. But I get closer to being a #60 with each passing year.

Grandpa's Surer H, 1944 H, My ole 1066, 710 6-16 Automatic, Little Genius plows, 1 and 2 bottom ,2 bottom Little Wonder,2-#27V mowers, a #25 mower, #7 mower, 240 HM, 2 row cultivators, High wheel McCormick grain drill, S-3 Cream Separator. Collecting ole Red Iron can be expensive, But It sure is fun.

#14 farmertony

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:05 PM

deere was little bitty company in ww2 nothong near the size of IHC
BORN AND BRED ON TRACTORS OF RED

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#15 Guy Fay

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:40 PM

GM had many different divisions. Allison Engines was one- aircraft engines, including the engines for the P-39, P-40, P-38, and early P-51s. Cleveland Engine build sub engines.

Case built B-26 wings (Grandma Marian worked at the Rockford plant for awhile where they were produced). They also built a whole bunch of magnetos for aircraft applications.

Allis built a bunch of turbochargers (many of which went into P-38s) and, by weight, most of the equipment used in the Manhatten Project.

I just found a page a few days ago that listed IH military contracts up through about 1965.

Aircraft: Engine cowlings, wheels and brakes, engine parts, nose gears
Ammunition- a bunch of fuses for different applications, shell and bomb. Shells included 37MM, 40MM, 75MM, 105MM, and shell parts.

Vehicles: Military Motor Trucks, 6x6 trucks, 4x4 trucks, Dump Trucks, cargo trucks, fire trucks, mobile canteens, ambulances, rocket launcher trucks, halftracks, tank recovery vehicles, medium tanks, light tanks, airborne crawler tractors, crawler tractors, high speed personnel tractors, armored infantry vehicles, cargo tractors, transmissions and final drives for British Cruser Tanks, 57MM antitank gun carriages, 155 MM gun carriages

Weapons: 20MM aircraft guns, M1 Garands, Firing pins, Automatic loaders for Bofors 40MM guns, 20 MM antiaircraft gun mounts, Gun Mounts, 57 MM, M2 Trackers for electrical gun directors, gun tubes, aircraft torpedoes

Others: Generators, Diesel Engines, gasolene engines, power units, truck chassis, Steam Winches, blood bank refrigerators, invasion ice chests

R&D projects: LIghtweight tank suspensions, noise and vibration reduchtion for tracekd vehicles, lots of other suspension research, Universal ENgineer tractor, LPG snow tractor, 8x8 10 ton vehicle, high pressure hydraulic systems, others
All sorts of parts for other vehicles. Castings and forging for other companies. IH apparently made tooling for other companies.
So many tractors, so little time, money, space, patience, mechanical ability, and Cheetoes.

The only good wine is made by the Reverend.

First drove a Farmall C at age 3- shoved in the clutch and started to roll towards the river. It's been all downhill from there.

#16 Guy Fay

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:43 PM

And that was just in the US. IH Canada, IH Great Britain, and IH Australia made a bunch of stuff. The German and captured French plants generally stuck to ag equipment from what I understand. At least one IH German employee was questioned by the Gestapo about that... Neuss Works on an island in the Rhine River tended to stick out like a sore thumb to the early radar bombing systems, that plant was plastered.
So many tractors, so little time, money, space, patience, mechanical ability, and Cheetoes.

The only good wine is made by the Reverend.

First drove a Farmall C at age 3- shoved in the clutch and started to roll towards the river. It's been all downhill from there.

#17 Howard_P

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Posted 31 October 2009 - 07:52 PM

Two items of clarification--IH did not build any actual Jeeps (although Ford did, probably as many or more than Willys.) IH did build military-styled 4x4 trucks as small a 1/2 ton.

IH M-1 rifle production was in the 1952-54 period, not during WWII.

And I've read that IH developed a medium duty tank to be built at Bettendorf, but the contract was cancelled because the Army decided it was too small and Bettendorf was used for rebuilding Sherman Tanks instead.

Howard

#18 Tim in NB

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 06:36 AM

Here is one of the others:

The following information comes from Cockshutt, The Complete Story:

For WW2, the Brantford plant manufactured undercarriages for several models of bombers, plywood fuselages and wings for Anson Trainers and the Mosquito Bomber, artillary trailers and artillary shells of various sizes. Branford Coach and Body was turning out mechanical transport bodies, ambulances and specialty trailers. The Frost & Wood plant manufactured the gun limbers for the 25 pounder and assorted bridge and transport equipment as well as mills hand grenades.
IH - TD-5, 70 Snow Blower

Cub Cadet - 127

Case - 1390

Cockshutt - 60

#19 MOChad

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 08:33 AM

"The government also incouraged all industry to get involved with production of the war machine in the name of victory. Which industry did, that is how they survived.

If you look in the pre WWII period, there were dozens, if not a hundred smaller tractor manufacturers across the U.S. After WWII many of these couldn't readjust production fast enough and were left behind and shuttered. As opposed to surviving, WWII policies killed a great many small manufacturers.
Present CaseIH 7140, 7120, 5240, 5140, IH 5488, IH 1466, 966. 1480

Family IH's past M, 400x2, 450, 460x2, 706G, 856, 1256, 966, 1086, 895CIH


Too bad Ignorance isn't painful!

#20 Super A

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 09:24 AM

"The government also incouraged all industry to get involved with production of the war machine in the name of victory. Which industry did, that is how they survived.

If you look in the pre WWII period, there were dozens, if not a hundred smaller tractor manufacturers across the U.S. After WWII many of these couldn't readjust production fast enough and were left behind and shuttered. As opposed to surviving, WWII policies killed a great many small manufacturers.


From what I have learned, the Great Depression closed a lot of those small tractor companies. They were gone before WWII ever started.

Al
Let us pray for farmers and all who prepare the soil for planting, that the seeds they sow may lead to a bountiful harvest. Super A, 424, 230, Super M, Cub, 52R combines, R-160 truck, 856 D, Super A-1, 12 geese, and 7 cats



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