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Tell me how a water inj. system on a pulling tractor works?


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#1 Hydro70

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 04:18 PM

First off I remember back in the seventies that pullers went to using water injection systems on their tractors to keep them from blowing up from the heat being generated and second question is how does two or more turbos hooked up do there job over using just one, aint that a intense amount of air being sent back into the engine, seems like the pressure would explode the engine, Ive never really been told how all this works and so on. Tell me more stuff on pulling tractors that you see but dont really understand how it all works :huh:
My family owned a International Harvester farm machinery dealership in south central Kentucky called Hancock Tractor Sales from 1975 to 1984 and now days I collect 1/16th and 1/64th scale tractors and machinery. Ive done two tours of combat in Iraq as a infantryman with the U.S. Army. I currently retired from the U.S. Army and the Kentucky National Guard

#2 Nebraska1206

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 06:29 PM

I'm no expert, we'll start off by saying that right away! But I'll try & answer best I can, based off what I've seen.

Water injection can be done several ways. You can spray it just ahead of the compressor wheel of the turbo. Most will call this a "wet" turbo. The water does need to be in a spray form, but the turbo can & does do some of the mixing of the air & water. Some say its hard on the impeller fins of the turbo, but on certain applications (think 3 & 4 charger Diesel Super Stock tractors) a "wet" turbo is necessary.

A more common method is injecting water thru a nozzle into the turbo crossover tube between the turbo & the intake manifold. My friends Deere superfarm is this way. One key element is the jet needs to be indexed, so the water sprays downstream into the intake, & not try & spray against the direction of the air movement. I think this setup takes a lil higher pressure pump to push the water, but its a common setup.

Another setup I've seen, mainly on 400 series IH engines, is the drilling & tapping of the cylinder head on the intake side, for six ports, allowing a water jet to be installed into each intake port. Don't know much more about that one, other tan I'm sure there's a lot of plumbing involved.

I can't say much on the multi-charger engines, because I've never been around them. All I do know, is that they don't have quite the compression that a normal diesel has, and they sure love their ether to get going, mainly because w/ a lower compression, they can't build the heat up right away to get fired. One of the guys I work used to work with now is a key guy w/ the Chance Encounter DSS tractor. I haven't seen them pull yet, but I'm hoping to see the tractor in Wisner in a few weeks.

I'll leave more to the experts.
'66 1206 puller, '67 1206, '67 1256, whats left of another '67 1256 (parts), & 682 Cub Cadet are mine; Dad has a 1066 B.S., 826D, 756D, two 706's w/ D310's, '53 Super M (stage 2), 1640 combine, and a 1650 Cub Cadet. All located in Northeast Nebraska.

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"Oh, you hate your job, oh my god, why didn't you say so? Ya know, there's a support group for that, it's called Everybody! They meet at the bar!" Drew Carey

TEAM 407: "We don't care about your intake manifold part number!"

Link to my Facebook album of the 1206 puller project

#3 wildfire1206

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 06:53 PM

Pretty much what Matt said. Its also boost activated when it gets to a certain point. Some have a belt drive pump, and some have a crank to pump type mount. Theres many different options when it comes to water injection.
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#4 Redpower1456

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 07:44 PM

I remember water injection being used on the turbojet engines in B-52 bombers and KC-135 tankers for added takeoff power years ago. I think the newer turbofan jet engines do not use or need water injection.

Don't ask me what this has to do with this tractor pulling question though. :ph34r: :P

Rick G.

Tractors owned: 1970 IH 1456, Serial # 11314, 1976 IH 1466 Black Stripe, Serial # 30313


#5 wildfire1206

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 07:51 PM

I remember water injection being used on the turbojet engines in B-52 bombers and KC-135 tankers for added takeoff power years ago. I think the newer turbofan jet engines do not use or need water injection.

Don't ask me what this has to do with this tractor pulling question though. :ph34r: :P

Rick G.


Thats where the idea got started for tractor pulling.
IH966,1066,1456,1256,1026,1026,656; White 4-180;

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TEAM 407: "We don't care about your intake manifold part number."

#6 dale560

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 08:19 PM

hi dad has a 47 d jd that has the factory water burn setup on it. you had to use straight water or alcohol in the radiator i think. dale

#7 JDZ

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 08:30 PM

Is the water injection constant, and the fuel amount changes with the throttle? I had always thought that when the smoke went from white to black that the water was going away and the fuel was being opened up.

Also, to add to Hydro70's questions, tell me about dry blocks. As in no coolant. Are all the Super Stock and Pro Stock engines dry? What is the reason?

#8 IH1466

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 08:31 PM

We use a boost sensor in the crossover pipe set at 20 psi to turn our electric pump on. You feed power to the sensor and when it gets to 20 psi it closes the circuit and kicks on the pump. From there we feed a small aluminum block with 6 outlets on it. From there it goes to each individual cylinder(port water injection). It has been fool proof until this year. I think the sensor is shot but haven't gotten anything to work right with it yet to be 100% sure. We also have an override switch on the throttle to kick it on if it doesn't work with the boost sensor.

Feeding the water into the turbo is tough on the wheel. With the rpm's the turbo spins, the water is just like putting sand into it. You usually need a new compressor wheel after 40 to 50 hooks. We have always went into the crossover pipe or used the port injection.

The multi-turboed tractors usually run a small cubic inch, under 540, there are a lot at 504. They use stages to build their boost. They start with a smaller one and feed a bigger one. Just add a bigger one until you have as many as you want, 2,3, or 4. The end result is about 120 to 150 psi of boost and a heck of a lot of power. Running that kind of boost, the larger cubes don't hold up very well. They also girdle the block. That means the make a spacer to put between the main cap bolts and the main cap to hold the block a little more solid.
75 1466 BS, 73 1466 w/my brother, 67 1256 w/my brother, 75 1568 w/my dad, 93 9230 w/my dad, 95 7220 MFD w/ my dad, 9 shank Glencoe Disk Chisel, 724 JD Finisher, 1770 JD planter w/ my dad, Unverferth 430 gravity box, Unverferth 2750 seed runner, 00 Peterbilt 379 exhd, 09 Timpte Hopper.

Sell Peterson Farms Seed when I am not driving truck, farming, or wrenching.

Collecting 1466 and 5488 serial numbers, any condition, as long as you can read the serial number tag. Still running or salvaged, would like to have the number, tractor location and condition, and an owners name.

Looking for 1466 serial numbers 19118, 19120, and 28191

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#9 IH1466

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 08:36 PM

Is the water injection constant, and the fuel amount changes with the throttle? I had always thought that when the smoke went from white to black that the water was going away and the fuel was being opened up.

Also, to add to Hydro70's questions, tell me about dry blocks. As in no coolant. Are all the Super Stock and Pro Stock engines dry? What is the reason?


Not all supers and prostocks are dry. Pretty much all the supers on alcohol are dry. There are some diesels that are but not to many.

The smoke going from grey to black is when it finally builds enough heat and boost to burn all the fuel. I think most of the more sophisticated water set ups use a valve that opens with the boost pressure to give it more water or less depending on the boost pressure. So the water will come on slowly as boost and heat begin to build in the engine.
75 1466 BS, 73 1466 w/my brother, 67 1256 w/my brother, 75 1568 w/my dad, 93 9230 w/my dad, 95 7220 MFD w/ my dad, 9 shank Glencoe Disk Chisel, 724 JD Finisher, 1770 JD planter w/ my dad, Unverferth 430 gravity box, Unverferth 2750 seed runner, 00 Peterbilt 379 exhd, 09 Timpte Hopper.

Sell Peterson Farms Seed when I am not driving truck, farming, or wrenching.

Collecting 1466 and 5488 serial numbers, any condition, as long as you can read the serial number tag. Still running or salvaged, would like to have the number, tractor location and condition, and an owners name.

Looking for 1466 serial numbers 19118, 19120, and 28191

http://www.petersonfarmsseed.com/

#10 Nebraska1206

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 08:46 PM

My 407 block is gonna be dry. I had it filled for strength purposes, simply because it was bored out. I don't plan on running it any longer than runs down the track, so it should be fine. I'll still have water flowing in the cylinder head. Hope stuff works like I have planned, darn thing is still on the stand. :mellow:
'66 1206 puller, '67 1206, '67 1256, whats left of another '67 1256 (parts), & 682 Cub Cadet are mine; Dad has a 1066 B.S., 826D, 756D, two 706's w/ D310's, '53 Super M (stage 2), 1640 combine, and a 1650 Cub Cadet. All located in Northeast Nebraska.

"Think Outside The Bun!" - Taco Bell

"Oh, you hate your job, oh my god, why didn't you say so? Ya know, there's a support group for that, it's called Everybody! They meet at the bar!" Drew Carey

TEAM 407: "We don't care about your intake manifold part number!"

Link to my Facebook album of the 1206 puller project



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