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IH 150 B Track Loader


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#1 kylenks

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Posted 30 March 2005 - 11:43 AM

150b.jpg Im a looking at buying a International 150 B track loader and am wondering what to look for beings that I know just about next to nothing on anything tracked. Pretty much just wanting it to play around on my quarter. anyways, the guy is asking three grand for it. Ive ran it around his yard and it seems to run pretty good, no major leaks on any hydraulics that I can see. What all should I be looking for on this as far as the undercarriage or anything else. Im not going to mind if I have to do some repairs on it (in fact i would probably enjoy a few) but dont want to end up having to be dumping money into it constantly. Thanks for any advice.

#2 unscrupless_modifer

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Posted 30 March 2005 - 01:29 PM

kylenks, Looks about like mine. Sept mines red. Try to determine if the heads cracked......Bubbles in the rad wihen running. Look at the back of it for welds in the supports for the loader where the fore and aft blots go through. The damage comes from backing and turning with a bucket full. The high seat models (after mine) were built much stronger. It should be a fun machine.
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#3 Drott-150

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Posted 31 March 2005 - 09:13 AM

Hey kylenks, welcome aboard. I have a 150 loader that I've owned for a little over a year now. I used it all last year to log a bunch of downed trees on a large lot I own, to clear out a building site area, and to install an 800' driveway through dense woods up hill and dale. I put about 350 hours on it so far, and it has been a superb machine, very reliable, very powerful and smooth running. It has served me very well, I can certainly attest to that.

What to look for? Well, I'm hardly the expert because my machine was in very good shape when I bought it and very little has gone wrong with it. But lets see if I can cover the basics:

1. Check all the fluids - Check the engine oil, transmission fluid, hydraulic fluid, radiator coolant, and final drive oil levels; ensure they are all up to level. Make sure the transmission and hydraulic oil are clean, they should be golden and clear (i.e. and not look like motor oil). Drain a little final drive oil out of both sides to see if there are chunks of metal coming out of either side.

2. Physically inspect machine for damage - Obviously look it over very closely. Look for welds on the frame, missing bolts, inspect the underside and see if anything is bent, deformed or mashed up.

3. Check the final drives - The final drives are the housings (and their internal gears/bearings etc) that the sprockets bolt to. These can and do go bad on old crawlers, so make sure there are no oil leaks coming from the drives seal area. Also, try and get the weight off the rear sprockets (backing up over a small log works) so you can put a pry bar to them (without damaging anything!) to see if there is excessive radial or lateral play in them. If there is, the bearing(s) are shot and this is not a good sign. If oil levels are low, this is also a bad sign.

4. Check the undercarriage - If you don't know anything about crawlers, it's really best you have an expert look this machine over. The UC is the most important part to look at. You could sink $10k into an UC if it's worn out, if you have a good UC nearly everything else is not as expensive to repair/replace. There are some measurements you can make on the tracks to see how worn they are. Unfortunately all I have is a website that shows chain elongation values, but there are several more measurements that you could technically make. I don't have the website handy with me now, but I'll post it later for you. Basically you want to inspect the grousers (the shoes that tread on the earth), the rails or links (the part that bolts to the grousers), the pins and bushings (the elongation chart will check those), the rollers, and the idlers (especially the two big front ones). You also want to check the track tensioners to make sure they work ok and are capable of maintaining proper tension. The rollers are supposed to be lubricated with a gear oil injector oiler. Find out if the owner has been lubricating them. If not (or even if he has), then ride the machine up over the small log (as decribed for the final drive inspection) and remove the weight and track contact from the rollers. Check them for wear/excessive play by prying on them (appropriately) with a pry bar. See if they are worn out (they're about $350 a piece if they are). Then fill them with gear oil using a homemade injector, you'll need a small length of the smallest dia steel brake line available at NAPA etc, a gallon of gear oil and pump along with the plumbing square drive wrench required to open up the plugs. After filling them, run the machine a bit and see if you see oil coming out of any of the rollers - and look on the inside (underneath the machine) as well for leakage. Leakage means blown seals, which aren't really that expensive (Ive heard they are like $20 each), but it may imply the rollers have been run dry. Also, come back the next day and inspect for leakage, sometimes it takes a day or more for leakage to be noticeable.

There is so much to describe and get into detail with its hard to put it all down in one post. One good thing you can do is to take detailed pictures of the tracks and the various components and then post them here for feedback.

5. Transmission - If this is a powershift machine (like my machine) then run the machine for at least 15 minutes and let it warm up good. Put it through its paces by digging, moving forwards and backwards, turning left and right and carrying a load up a hill (both forward and backward). Listen for whining or crunching sounds and observe any loss in pushing power. Watch the transmission oil pressure gage and make sure it is in the green zone (make sure the gage is working ok). Make sure the coolant and oil temps are all reasonable. The 282 engine is known for cracking heads if it overheats or is cooled suddenly. There are three filters on the powershift machine. There are two identical metal mesh screen type transmission filters, one is called the suction filter and the other the safety filter. One of them is under the seat and the other is in the engine compartment (I believe on the left side). I would open them up and check the contents inside, make sure there is no metal or serious crud in there. A few clutch pack particles are normal, chunks of metal and rubber seal fragments are not. These filters have o-rings sealing surfaces and the filters are reusable, so you wont need new filters or anything. The main transmission filter (paper cartridge) can also be checked and/or replaced (they're available at most automotive stores for around $20). It's located next to the operator in the housing under the powershift lever (on the left side).

6. Check the clutches and brakes - The clutches are the dry type on this machine, and can be checked during the tranmission test above. Mainly just make sure the clutches are not frozen and that they freely disengage and re-engage as desired. Make sure they do not slip and that the machine will push hard when you want it to. Digging on a stump is a good way to ensure the clutches are holding up, but dont overdo it, you don't want to blow out any final drives by abusing the machine. Check the clutch adjustment under the floorboards to see how much adjustment has been used up too. There are two access panels under the machine (directly under the operators seat), which provide access to the brakes. The brakes are band types that actuate on the clutch drums. If you remove these two panels, you can see how much brake pad is left on each one. You can also see if there is any excessive oil leakage coming from the tranny or final drives into this area as well. Check the adjusters too to make sure they are ok and working properly. When you're running the machine the brakes should firmly hold each side (with clutch lever pulled back) when desired, although the controls are pretty heavy on this old machine.

7. Check the loader pins and bushings - Inspect the loader frame and bucket pins/bushings. See if everything is greased or if its dry and crusty. Most properly maintained machines look a bit messy and have a bit of grease smeared around the various pivot points. An overly clean, non messy machine with dry pins is not a good sign. When you're working the machine see if you can detect excessive motion/play in the various hinge points. Also listen for squeaks in the farme as its moving up and down/articulating. But don't confuse the harmless squeak of the bucket position indicator (a sliding rod "pointer" located on the left hydraulic ram and visible to the operator) with worn pins.

8. Check the hydraulics - Make sure hydraulics work properly and there are no excessive whining or grinding sounds coming from the hydraulic pump. Fully articulate the entire loader and bucket in all dimensions - fully extend the chrome cylinders and examine them for chipping, pitting or rust. Look for leaks around packings. You should be able to pick up a load of dirt and let the bucket sit there without it falling off or dropping. You should also be able to push the bucket down and jack the front of the machine up off the ground. It should hold this position for a good while without having to hold the stick forward. Check the "float" feature which is the stick position that allows the bucket and loader to "float" and simply lay freely on the ground. Do this by pushing the main loader lever ALL the way forward until you feel a click - this is the float detent. Try backdragging with the machine with the float on and make sure the bucket really is floating up and down over obstacles freely. Look over the hydrospring. The hydrospring is that big spring thing located next to the operator. It is there to absorb the shock input that occurs when the bucket is raised up and down with a load, thereby keeping maximum internal hydraulic pressures much lower than they otherwise would be. These have a tendency to leak a bit, a small leak is ok, a big one is not. There is a large seal inside of this thing that can be compressed/tightened with a spanner wrench on a nut that is accessible from the hydrospring housing. Lastly, check over all the hydraulic lines including the ones under the powershift lever housing (for the transmission). I had some dry rotted ones on the main lift cylinders of my machine I had to replace shortly after buying my machine. They're pretty pricey, so consider their expense if several of them are shot.

9. Engine - I'm no diesel mechanic, but there are a few peculiar things Ive learned to look for on these engines that distinguish them from gas engines. First as mentioned earlier, these old 282's are vulnerable to head cracks if they are overheated or shock cooled, so check for that. I've also heard that when the shaft seals in the fuel pump go up on many diesels, it can result in diesel fuel seeping into the crankcase and diluting/overfilling the oil level. Check the motor oil level and see if it's overfilled and/or seems dilute and/or smells like diesel. Leaky injectors can do the same thing - while the machine is setting (i.e. not running) fuel seeps through them and into the cylinders, eventually migrating down to the crankcase. These engines are hard to start in the cold. Mine starts ok as long as it's above 32 deg F, beyond that it can be tough. Check the glowplugs and see if they are all working. Ask the owner if he uses ether to start it. There are mixed opinions as to whether or not ether is ok to use on older diesel engines, but generally speaking if you can avoid it, avoid it. Ether can really hammer the pistons and ruin rings. It also destroys glowplugs and I've heard that if you use glowplugs along with ether, you can really do some damage. I would see if the glowplugs work and ask the owner if he has always used ether to gage the likely condition of the rings (and glowplugs). Other than that, if you know gas engines much of it is similar from what I've seen.


As far as spare parts - I've never had to buy anything from the dealer for this machine, so I can't say how available new/dealer parts are. But the 150 loader is based on the TD9B dozer chassis, which was quite common and manufactured for over 10 years. Plus there are a decent number of 150's out there, I see them from time to time on ebay etc. So used parts shouldn't be too bad, you just may have to search and wait a bit. I have bought all of the filters I've needed at the local Advance or NAPA auto parts stores, no problem there at all. Loader/hydraulic parts are fairly generic and can be fabricated and/or adapted by any good hyd shop if need be. Motor rebuild kits are widely available. I believe most of the UC is available, although Im not sure about sprockets and front idlers. But even if they're not available new, they can be refurbished.

As far as price - if this machine has powershift, runs good, has minimal leaks, everything works, the finals are tight and the UC is in reasonable shape; then $3000 is an absolute steal in my opinion.

Good luck

#4 Drott-150

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Posted 31 March 2005 - 10:46 AM

kylenks - here are some links that will be useful to you. The first describes the basics for undercarriages. It also has an excellent old IH track maintenance manual that you can download for free. The second one is for gaging track length for assessing pin/bushing wear and for gaging link/rail height.

http://www.tractorpa...dercarriage.htm

http://www.crawlerhe...links_chart.htm

#5 kylenks

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Posted 31 March 2005 - 09:47 PM

WOW! I cant thank you guys enough! Im going to be going down this weekend to look it over again and will take some more picures. I had noticed that he had replaced head gasket so Im gonna look closer at that. I did notice a couple of times when I would go to give it throttle it would just stay idling and other times would be fine. Possible thats just something with the linkage??? Anyways, thank you both again very much.



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