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Cutting a road on side of steep hill


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#1 Final Drive

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 09:53 PM

I recently started building a road for my neighbor thats about a half mile long where the first 300 feet cut along the side of a steep hill (about 50 degree angle uphill from level.) My question is how did the pros work these old machines with no tilt, side to side on their blades or in my case the bucket, to cut into the high side of a hill & move material to the downhill side of a road ? I`m doing it by moving my 3 rippers to the high side of the 5 slots in the tool bar & heading downhill on the roughed in road. Then I head uphill,bucket down to scoop up the broken up dirt to to fill up bucket & pivot downhill to dump load, back scrape & repeate over & over again gradually working my way uphill. Is this how the pros did it? I`m using ancient TD6 drott skid loader,standard bucket, no R.O.P. Is there a better way?

#2 gilligan

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 10:59 PM

Wondered that one myself there Finaldrive, I know there
was some talk about it here awhile back, but as usual can't remember specifics.



Gilligan

#3 captain_crunch

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 11:26 PM

How about some pics of project. Sawmill will be more help than me beings most of my road construction scares your average goat :P :P
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#4 overland47

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 11:37 PM

How do you eat a horse? One bite at a time..... :D :P :D

Just kiddin...I have no idea what I'm doing most of the time.....the key is making it look like you do :lol: I've found with mine patience is definately a virtue. Here is what I do know, spend some time on your landing/start point, cause that will determine how it will end up. good luck.

Just noticed you have a loader....might make it interesting.
Some pics would help
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#5 Ragnor

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Posted 14 March 2006 - 11:54 PM

Much easyer to work downhill and use gravity to your advantage......to keep things reasonably level, crosswise, keep a ridge of material on the outside of the cut, and put the outside track on this as needed. With 'dozer or bucket, material will have to be swung over the outside to avoid building up too much directly in front of the machine. When done the full length of cut, this ridge can be graded off to make a wider road. Working uphill makes for a very gradual incline, and works the heck out of the machine. One secret to accomplishing a gradual incline in as short a distance as possable, is to make the side cut going against the flow of water, as in a ravine situation, if location permits. Have timmed to "finnished" condition, cut and fill slopes on roads/highways without the aid of hydraulic tilts on the angle dozer more often than I care to remember, and this was done by working parralell with the slope, NOT going up and down with a straight blade. Possable to trim a near two to one slope in this manner, but must be done in a once over effort, moving a maximum amount of material the machine will push/roll, which holds the equipment to the slope. Undercarriage MUST be in top notch condition to avoid walking out of the tracks, and, this is terribly hard on sprockets and rails, not to mention the effects on the operator.......posted much of this on ibdozing, which is now in the archives, ....have a good one, R.

#6 sawmill

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 12:08 AM

Start on a level spot, dig from the upper side
and dump it as fill to the lower side. Don't
worry about finish grading until you get your
road cut and level. Just don't run out on loose
fill. Make short fills and your loader will compact
it as you go. I have built miles of road with a
trackloader. Once you get enough dirt pushed
and dumped out in front of you. You can just
roll the bucket to the full dump position and
spread it. Just don't get too cocky without a
canopy on loose fill. :lol: :lol:

#7 captain_crunch

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 12:17 AM

Sawmill
That must be my problem I pick the wrong level spot :angry: :angry: :angry: :angry: :angry: The hill side was proably flatter before I tried to build road than it was when I finished :( :( :(
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#8 Final Drive

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 02:45 AM

Thank You everyone for the replies. As for requests for pictures I`d love to but all I have is this obsolete WEB TV machine & digital pictures aren`t possible ,sorry. To ragnor the comment of making a side cut against the flow of water to gain gradual incline in a short distance befuddles me ...must dumb down befores I can understand. The trick seems to be able to build up a ridge exactly where the lower track will follow & that takes finness thats hard to put into words. not exactly sure how to do that yet but I can fake it if someones watching.

#9 Ron G

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 05:08 AM

Mostly good advice here,it takes a long time to make a machine "behave" and think like you do so get used to the frustrations and accept that this is how you learn.
Basically as was said before here you need to get the machine in "position" to do the work you need to accomplish.Keep in mind that a straight line is not the neccessarily the quickest way to get to your objective.
Think always about the position thing that I mentioned,in your case the way to achieve that is building a berm on the low side to run your track on and you can feel your way along as you go and don't be too brave as Sawmill said.
You have the advantage of a bucket which will help with the compaction too if you roll back and forth over your work with it full.
Go slow and take your time,if you don't have another piece of equipment around to pull you out you will want to be even more careful about what you attempt.
One thing to bear in mind when working a steep slope like that is how are you going to contain the bank when you are finished?
You can't have rocks rolling off of the hill and end up blocking your driveway or worse,injuring someone so you will probably have to cut the bank way back and use the material elsewhere.If erosion will be a problem or runoff from heavy rain you will need to cut a swail on the high side which can also serve to catch any rocks that might roll off of the hill.
Don't rush and don't forget,someone has been in the same situation before,it can be done!!:)) Ron G

#10 IHIAM

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Posted 15 March 2006 - 07:07 AM

Thank You everyone for the replies.  As for requests for pictures I`d love to but all I have is this obsolete WEB TV machine & digital pictures aren`t possible ,sorry.  To ragnor the comment of making a side cut against the flow of water to gain gradual incline in a short distance befuddles me ...must dumb down befores I can understand. The trick seems to be able to build up a ridge exactly where the lower track will follow & that takes finness thats hard to put into words.  not exactly sure how to do that yet but I can fake it if someones watching.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

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just dig in and with the material in your bucket start a berm along the low side. keep the berm level and a bit higher elevation then the other side where your other track travels and this will force your bucket into the material you want to remove. As the berm gets compacted you can dress it up with more material and grade it so you stay slanted into the hillside. works everytime.



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